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Millers Court Residents, 1888

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  • Tania Edwards
    replied
    Virtual Reality tour of Millers Court

    Might be of interest.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlqov49u_dM

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    OK. If you stand on my shoulders, Gerald, you should be able to reach the lowest branch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    I have always held strong opinions regarding Gerald, and the more I think the matter over, the stronger do these opinions become. The truth, however, will never be known, and did indeed, at one time lie at the top of a fruit tree, if my conjections be correct!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    By a remarkable coincidence, Colin, I've been searching through the London Hospital Archives, and can reveal the following residents on the "ground floor" of Miller's Court, during the years 1888-89

    #1 Julia Venturney
    #2 George and Jane Keyler
    #3 Mrs Kennedy
    #4 Montague John Druitt
    #5 Mary Ann Cox
    #6 David Cohen
    #7 Seweryn Klosowski
    #8 Walter Sickert
    #9 John Pizer
    #10 Mary Pearcey
    #11 William Bury
    #12 Gerald the Orang-Utan
    #13 [Vacant]


    ... an embarrassment of riches!

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  • Colin Macdonald
    replied
    Originally posted by Phillip Walton View Post
    Is there any way of linking BMD records with a specific address? People are being born and die all the time so if any birth and death records for Millers Court for say 1887-1889 could be found it might provide more information.
    The London Hospital Archives might turn up one or two. My daughter and I once spent a day looking for various names. Has anyone been through them looking specifically for addresses rather than names?

    Leave a comment:


  • Anna Morris
    replied
    The 1881 and 1891 censuses don't give any names at those numbers either. Were they actual residences or something else? Could that be McCarthy's shop? ( forum.casebook.org/archive/index.php/t-9825.html )

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  • Matt Leyshon
    replied
    Number's 9 and 10

    Hi All,

    Wanted to give this a bump as I am putting together a census of Miller's Court for a book I am writing.

    Was it ever established who lived in 9 and 10? I did not see anything in the thread that stated so but wanted to check if anybody had any new intel on this.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    Is there any way of linking BMD records with a specific address? People are being born and die all the time so if any birth and death records for Millers Court for say 1887-1889 could be found it might provide more information.

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Curryong View Post
    Going back to the query about residents of 9 and 11 Millers Court, (sorry,) I believe Chris Scott gave information on an entry into the Whitechapel infirmary involving a porter called Henry Hemslow who was admitted on Feb 9th, due to 'debility'. He was married and lived at 11 Miller's Court. Of course if he resided there the previous November, who knows! He was discharged 18th February 1889.

    http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=64
    His name turned out to be Henry Hanslope, Curryong and the rest of the thread you linked to is about his life and antics. He was a strange character and in trouble with police a number of times.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curryong
    replied
    Going back to the query about residents of 9 and 11 Millers Court, (sorry,) I believe Chris Scott gave information on an entry into the Whitechapel infirmary involving a porter called Henry Hemslow who was admitted on Feb 9th, due to 'debility'. He was married and lived at 11 Miller's Court. Of course if he resided there the previous November, who knows! He was discharged 18th February 1889.

    http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=64

    Leave a comment:


  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Debs, wasn't there a story in WWD's book, about Kelly and Prater saying goodbye, and Kelly called her 'young dear' or some such, which WWD thought was cute considering Prater's supposed age?
    In a newspaper interview Prater said that she said to Mary, "Good night old dear," and that Mary replied, "Good night my pretty." WWD thought this was sweetly ironic in that Mary was young, not old and Prater was supposed to be older and not pretty.

    In that same newspaper article Prater said Mary was wearing her hat and jacket that Thursday night around 9:00 pm.( Prater noted that she herself did not own a hat and jacket.) This is a curious statement in that we read otherwise of Mary going bare headed and wearing a maroon crossover. We know Mary had a hat available, at least the one left by Maria Harvey. I still find it important that a number of newspaper reports said the Ripper burned Mary's black velvet jacket in the fire and that she was known for wearing that garment.

    In refreshing my memory of the conversation between Prater and Mary, I ended up finding this specific information in a short article on Prater based largely on Chris Scott's work. There is a bit more I will take to the other thread on Prater as I believe it belongs there better than here.

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  • Debra Arif
    replied
    I'll move this Prater identification to a new thread, Robert

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  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi Robert,

    What's not to follow?

    Two named women living in Millers Court.

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Sorry Simon, I don't quite follow.

    Debs, against the idea of a young Prater is the sketch of her sitting up in bed on the night of the murder. That shows her as cruelly old, though of course the artist may never have seen her.

    I think the younger Prater seems to fit better, Robert. She was deserted at the right time and was separated from her husband still in 88 whereas with the older Prater of the same family she probably never left her husband as she's with him for all the census entries.
    A younger Prater opens up much more scope for mistaken identity scenarios with Kelly too. Perhaps Morris Lewis only ever knew MJK as a young woman who came and went via a door in the entrance passage to Miller's Court, hence his description differing a lot to that given by others who knew MJK?

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Sorry Simon, I don't quite follow.

    Debs, against the idea of a young Prater is the sketch of her sitting up in bed on the night of the murder. That shows her as cruelly old, though of course the artist may never have seen her.

    Leave a comment:

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