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Owners & Occupiers 1888 Mitre St and Sq

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  • #16
    Gary

    I agree that its pretty unlikely she'd be allowed in a private club....and probably meandered the area until she ran into the killer.
    Thanks for the reply.
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    • #17
      Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
      Gary

      I agree that its pretty unlikely she'd be allowed in a private club....and probably meandered the area until she ran into the killer.
      Thanks for the reply.
      How,

      I don't imagine those 'clubs' would have been very posh, though. A room or two with a few gambling tables and a bar would have sufficed. But even so, I imagine the 'Kates' of that world would probably have hung around in the street outside rather than have been welcomed inside.

      Gary

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      • #18
        I posted this on the GSG thread:

        I've got a really interesting old book called 'Houndsditch Day by Day' by Arthur Binstead. It contains a series of tongue-in-cheek anecdotes about the (primarily Jewish) inhabitants of Houndsditch and its environs ca 1900. Some of the language might be considered offensive today, but on the whole it's quite amusing. One chapter is titled 'The Demolition of Dook's Place'. In it the characters bemoan the loss of the gambling clubs in Dukes Place, especially 'Old Sol Bergmann's':

        "Old Sol Bergmann's!" prompted the prawn-peeler on the box.

        "Accha Nebbish! Old Sol Bergmann's!" asserted my right-hand Hebrew, evidently with keen relish for the recollection. "And yet, mind yer, Old Sol - Uncle Sol as everybody called him - never could ha' done as he did if Dook's Place hadn't been abserlootly the sportin' centre o' the East End."

        Could the ripper have chosen a more Jewish location than Mitre Square, hard by the two most prominent synagogues in London and a few steps away from the gambling dens of 'Dook's Place'?

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        • #19
          Thank you Gary....I hadn't seen that before.
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          • #20
            thanks

            Hello Debs. Thanks for all this hard work and research.

            Cheers.
            LC

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            • #21
              How,

              Unfortunately my copy doesn't have the wonderfully llustrated boards:

              Click image for larger version

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              Gary

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              • #22
                I think Kate was looking for income, not drink when she left jail. It is a good idea that she may have been thinking about the time when certain clubs may have had customers leaving.

                There is a bit of a pattern in Kate's last days. She and John Kelly seem to have been very loyal to each other. Even when they could not stay together they reunited every day. IMO, she failed to get the price of a bed on Saturday night. She was working her way back to John Kelly but had failed to earn enough to share his bed. Maybe she had two or three pennies, enough for a glass of rum or gin and in her under-fed state that was enough to cause her to become very drunk.

                If a bed was her biggest need she could have spent the rest of the night in jail. I think her deep loyalty to John impelled her to seek money rather than return to him penniless in the morning. He had no boots. In one of his interviews he said he was barefooted and that would make seeking work even more difficult. Probably the last of the money from pawning the boots had been spent. I think Kate planned to earn at least enough to provide breakfast for her and John and I think she had some likely way to earn or beg for money at that time of the night/morning.

                Kate was one who charred for the Jews. I have even wondered if she knew where she could approach a certain Jew that she could ask for work when things were particularly tough.
                The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                • #23
                  Hello Debs. Thanks for all this hard work and research.
                  -Lynn Cates-

                  Absolutely, LC.....I thought I had added it last month to the Notables, but didn't.
                  Kudos to Debs.
                  XXXXX
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post

                    Thanks Jerry. The land tax records obviously note the configuartion pre-Williams and Co when Rosa Borginsky had #11 and a note that all four premises are all one warehouse added.What was puzzling me was how these were two sets of houses numbered 1,2,3 listed in Mitre Square , the ones that became Williams owned by the Corporation of London and the other set owned by the United Synagogue ans becoming part of Kearley and Tonge. I guess one set were numbered after the other set became part of either warehouse premises but the land tax records noted previous and current configurations?

                    In fact, Rosa Borginsky is sill listed as the occupier and the Corporation of London as the owners of 2 mitre Square and 11 Mitre St right up to 1913 while William Shepherd is listed as owner and occupier of 10, 11 Mitre St in the same book.
                    Debs, sorry about this late addition to the thread, but I remembered you had mentioned Rosa Borginski in this thread. If you have access to the London Standard (January 21, 1888) there is a long article concerning a fire at Hutchinson Street and Ellison (off Middlesex Street). Rosetta Borginski (age 60) and three of her family members were killed in the fire. Rosetta died saving some of the residents of the house. She operated a chandlers shop in the first floor of the house.

                    I wonder if she is the same lady of Mitre Square mentioned here?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post

                      Debs, sorry about this late addition to the thread, but I remembered you had mentioned Rosa Borginski in this thread. If you have access to the London Standard (January 21, 1888) there is a long article concerning a fire at Hutchinson Street and Ellison (off Middlesex Street). Rosetta Borginski (age 60) and three of her family members were killed in the fire. Rosetta died saving some of the residents of the house. She operated a chandlers shop in the first floor of the house.

                      I wonder if she is the same lady of Mitre Square mentioned here?
                      Thanks Jerry, I will check that out. I think it is likely the same woman.

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