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  • Stoney Lane, date of opening.

    Hi everyone,
    On my new work on Mitre Square I am having a problem with finding the date that the extension of Stoney Lane to Houndsditch started and was completed.
    I know it was not there in Feb 87, but have found nothing else to confirm a date.


    Any help greatly appreciated


    Steve

  • #2
    Hi Steve


    This is from the London Evening Standard Apr 14th 1890. It's from a report by the Engineer to the City Commission of Sewers on works executed during the past year.
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Thanks Robert,
      that Narrows it down abit it's there by early 1890, and it had been finished in the preceeding year, the question of course is was it accessible on the night of the double event as a route.

      It's If the old buildings were still standing, or had they already been knocked down and a route availbe. My present view is still undecided but leaning towards not.
      This is simply to allow me to get my timings right for my work on Mitre Square, it doesn't have an effect either way from my point of view.


      Steve

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Steve Blomer View Post
        ... the question of course is was it accessible on the night of the double event as a route.
        Yes it was, according to City Surveyor Frederick Foster.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Scott Nelson View Post
          Yes it was, according to City Surveyor Frederick Foster.



          I should have checked that Scott, thanks for pointing that out.

          I have found a nice picture of cock and hoop yard( or the remains of it) from Sept 89.
          It shows the external wall of the the public house (nags head) being supported by struts in the newly formed road..
          Looks like the road opened around July 89.


          Steve

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          • #6
            Goads Fire map (1887) no. 71 also shows it quite nicely.

            Gavin Bromley in "City Beat Part 2" (Ripperologist no. 75, January 2007) details the entire area.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Scott Nelson View Post
              Goads Fire map (1887) no. 71 also shows it quite nicely.

              Gavin Bromley in "City Beat Part 2" (Ripperologist no. 75, January 2007) details the entire area.

              Scott thanks again, think we are at cross purposes here.
              I was asking if the direct entrance from Houndsditch was open in 88.
              Goad (71) shows it not so and as you rightly say Gavin Bromley does cover it in detail and questioned why Foster did not use that in his proposed route, preferring gravel lane..


              Gavin gave a good answer that Foster may have used older maps, however I am attempting to see if it's possible to be more conclusive.


              Many thanks for replying


              Steve

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              • #8
                Sorry Steve,

                At the time of the murders, it would have been a zig-zag route from Houndsditch to Stoney Lane.

                Across Duke Street to Houndsditch, right on Houndsditch to Gravel Lane, then left on Gravel Lane straight to Back Gravel Lane, north a bit to Stoney Lane, then right on Stoney Lane to Middlesex. At this point (if it was the actual route) the killer could either go north to Wentworth Street, or south to New Goulston Street, both of which crossed Goulston Street.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Scott Nelson View Post
                  Sorry Steve,

                  At the time of the murders, it would have been a zig-zag route from Houndsditch to Stoney Lane.

                  Across Duke Street to Houndsditch, right on Houndsditch to Gravel Lane, then left on Gravel Lane straight to Back Gravel Lane, north a bit to Stoney Lane, then right on Stoney Lane to Middlesex. At this point (if it was the actual route) the killer could either go north to Wentworth Street, or south to New Goulston Street, both of which crossed Goulston Street.



                  Thanks Scott,
                  That's my reading of the probably accessibility too.

                  However it's seems there is a possibility that some demolition could have already occurred in Houndsditch in 88, and that one could have walked direct, but it seems to be speculation rather than fact.


                  Unless I get confirmation of such accessibility, I will stick with what you suggest above, but give the speculative route as just that.


                  Again many thanks




                  Steve

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                  • #10
                    I just had another thought: That sometimes maps were drawn up for simplicity, particularly old ones with small scales. So a direct line (street) could have been drawn between Houndsditch and Stoney Lane, omitting the small twists and turns around Gravel and Back Gravel Lanes.

                    The underground Metropolitan Railway was constructed north-south through Back Gravel Lane in 1884. That could certainly messed up direct routes in the immediate area.

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