Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Charles Lechmere’s Lair?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Caroline Brown View Post

    Morning Gary,

    The Barretts of Goldie Street - cough cough - apparently knew something we didn't. They didn't think different styles of capital A would look at all odd in a Victorian era diary.

    Love,

    Caz
    X
    Ah but, Caz, did they repeatedly use a small letter to start a name?

    :-)

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
      Given the Cross, Lechmere and Forsdike connections to the boot making trade, and JALs relocation to the capital of boot making... is it at all likely that Old Ma really thought that JAL was dead?

      Given that the juvenile Thomas Cross lived a few miles from the Roulsons and Lechmeres in Hereford... is it likely they were unknown to each other?

      I believe most policemen, unless they were in a section house or other police provided accomodation, tended to live somewhat distant from their beat as it would make their domestic life less comfortable. Having said that... Acting Sergeant Amos Simpson lived a few hundred yards away from Cheshunt Police Station.
      But Tiger Bay is a different kettle of fish to Chesthunt - then and now.

      I don't think you will find a single house remaining from 1888 in the old parish of St John the Evangelist in the East.
      I’m not convinced that an East End shoemaker originally from Suffolk, would be familiar with the workforce in Northampton. Ditto a village shoemaker in Hereford.

      I doubt that everyone in Hereford city was familiar with everyone who lived in the surrounding countryside.

      As for the finding of an 1888 house, a tenner says I do.

      Comment


      • I once saw an old black and white film taken from a moving vehicle of some kind that went though Pinchin Street. I can’t remember whether it was on here or Casebook or something I found elsewhere.

        Comment


        • Northampton was the centre of the boot trade. It wasn't any old place.
          There were plenty of Lechmere's in London and relatives in Hackney.
          The Crosses lived in the Hereford suburbs.
          I suspect these trades were quite internally gossipy.

          Comment


          • The factor to take into consideration is actually...

            Should Old Ma have been apprehensive that the Crosses - who were involved in the shoe trade and who lived on the outskirts of Hereford, which was not much bigger than a large village in today's terms and where virtually everyone would have been familiar with everyone else - would have become aware that JAL was still living in Northampton, the epicentre of the shoe and boot industry - when other Lechmeres were involved in the same industry and were very prominent in the Hereford area - that the Crosses or other denizens of Hereford, let alone Old Ma's relatives, might raise an eyebrow at her marrying young TC?
            Or was it safer in the mean streets of St George's in the East?

            As for the old duffer Fosdike... ten years older than Old Ma... she entertained a wide age range... living in the East End with an adult CAL, other boot related Lechmeres near by... that was another risk. But better than destitution and Old Ma was used to these risks by now.

            After the death of her daughter she must have also relied on her son, just as he relied on her...

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
              Northampton was the centre of the boot trade. It wasn't any old place.
              There were plenty of Lechmere's in London and relatives in Hackney.
              The Crosses lived in the Hereford suburbs.
              I suspect these trades were quite internally gossipy.

              Yes, I know Northampton was the centre of the trade but I see no reason why it’s workforce would be known in other parts of the country. The greatest risk to Maria and Tom was staying in Hereford where JAL had a cousin who was a copper and presumably numerous other friends and acquaintances.

              Breinton was a ‘suburb’ in the 1850s?

              https://breintonparish.co.uk/plannin...bout-breinton/

              Incidentally, over on Casebook someone took me to task for promoting the Breinton TC as Maria’s ‘husband’. Apparently I was following the ‘party line’ without checking things out. And there was me thinking he was my discovery. Others were convinced he was a Hertfordshire man. (Coincidentally, I’m typing this in Herts.)

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post


                Yes, I know Northampton was the centre of the trade but I see no reason why it’s workforce would be known in other parts of the country. The greatest risk to Maria and Tom was staying in Hereford where JAL had a cousin who was a copper and presumably numerous other friends and acquaintances.

                Breinton was a ‘suburb’ in the 1850s?

                https://breintonparish.co.uk/plannin...bout-breinton/

                Incidentally, over on Casebook Ed someone took me to task for promoting the Breinton TC as Maria’s ‘husband’. Apparently I was following the party line without checking things out. And there was me thinking he was my discovery. Others were convinced he was a Hertfordshire man. (Coincidentally, I’m typing this in Herts.)
                Or is it Stretton Sugwas you are describing as a suburb of Hereford?

                Comment


                • I’m sure Ed knows more about the other Lechmeres in London than I do, but I believe at least one of JAL’s brothers was also a shoe/boot maker and was in London in the 1840s.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                    Ah but, Caz, did they repeatedly use a small letter to start a name?

                    :-)
                    Ha, I'd have to check, but I'm guessing that would have been as common in the late 20th as the late 19th century.

                    When I was at primary school in the early 1960s we learned old style capitals as well as modern. I always took care to use them consistently within a single piece of writing, but not everyone would.

                    Love,

                    Caz
                    X
                    I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

                    Comment


                    • Breinton to the centre of Hereford - 2.7 miles.
                      Stretton Sugwas to the centre of Hereford 3.4 miles.
                      Population of Hereford 1851 c.10,500.

                      I've driven around that area a few times and I can confirm the distances in 1851 are exactly the same as now.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                        Breinton to the centre of Hereford - 2.7 miles.
                        Stretton Sugwas to the centre of Hereford 3.4 miles.
                        Population of Hereford 1851 c.10,500.

                        I've driven around that area a few times and I can confirm the distances in 1851 are exactly the same as now.
                        How about 1861? ;-)

                        Back in those days it wasn’t unusual for people to rarely venture outside of their own parish. Leisure travel just wasn’t a thing for poor folk.

                        Comment


                        • The feudal age was well in the past and villeins were no longer restricted to their manor.
                          Hereford - a market town - was a mere few miles away.

                          Comment


                          • His Lordship wasn’t happy with our tutorial on East End topography. He scurried off, did a bit of Googling and proved us wrong (or so he thought):


                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • I wonder why Lord O thought that the Bradford Observer would be a reliable source of information about East End place names?

                              In common parlance, terms such as ‘Stepney’ and ‘Whitechapel’ were bandied about indiscriminately to describe the East End in general. Surely he must have come across that before.

                              And did he have no idea that there was more than one James Street in the East End?

                              If instead of taking the Bradford Observer’s report at face value he’d looked for a London paper to confirm his finding, he might have stumbled across Lloyds of 3rd December:
                              Attached Files

                              Comment


                              • So there was a James Street in Mile End as well as St Georges? Who’d a thunk it?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X