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Charles Lechmere’s Lair?

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  • Yes 7 of the am.
    0700 Hours.
    Set your alarm clock.

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    • Originally posted by Mark J D View Post
      >>That is a great photo.
      >> What would you say, circa late '40's or '50's?

      >It is!
      >
      >Yes, I think so. I’ve got the details somewhere.

      -- The three films legibly advertised ('First a Girl', 'Student's Romance', 'The Black Room') are all from 1935...

      https://www.jtrforums.com/filedata/fetch?id=584437

      M.
      Yes, thanks Mark!
      I looked at those signs and didn't even think to look up the movies.

      Comment




      • “The question of how conveyed is in the region of theory, for if conveyed by cart, then no limit can be fixed, but if by hand about 250 yards would be the limit; consequently enquiry has been made to find any shed house or place within that limit, so as to ascertain who what, and how the occupier was engaged, but more especially to find the missing parts.

        Donald Swanson
        Ch Inspr

        T Arnold Supd”

        11th September, 1889


        It’s interesting that he uses ‘shed’ first before he mentions ‘house’ and the more general ‘place’. Why not warehouse, yard, shop…?

        Unless the police were completely incompetent, of course they searched the catsmeat sheds in Backchurch Lane and made contact with their ‘occupier’. And if they were in the hands of the Lechmere family, then they would have most likely become aware of the names of Lechmere and/or Forsdike but probably not Cross.












        Comment


        • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

          “The question of how conveyed is in the region of theory, for if conveyed by cart, then no limit can be fixed, but if by hand about 250 yards would be the limit; consequently enquiry has been made to find any shed house or place within that limit, so as to ascertain who what, and how the occupier was engaged, but more especially to find the missing parts.

          Donald Swanson
          Ch Inspr

          T Arnold Supd”

          11th September, 1889


          It’s interesting that he uses ‘shed’ first before he mentions ‘house’ and the more general ‘place’. Why not warehouse, yard, shop…?

          Unless the police were completely incompetent, of course they searched the catsmeat sheds in Backchurch Lane and made contact with their ‘occupier’. And if they were in the hands of the Lechmere family, then they would have most likely become aware of the names of Lechmere and/or Forsdike but probably not Cross.











          Sounds very likely, yes.

          Admitting, as I must, my special interest in the Lechmere´s, I must say that this is one of the more fascinating threads I´ve read for quite a while.
          "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post

            Sounds very likely, yes.

            Admitting, as I must, my special interest in the Lechmere´s, I must say that this is one of the more fascinating threads I´ve read for quite a while.
            I’m glad you’re enjoying it, Christer. Of course, it’s the subject matter that’s fascinating. The Lechmeres are the gift that keeps on giving.


            Comment


            • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

              I’m glad you’re enjoying it, Christer. Of course, it’s the subject matter that’s fascinating. The Lechmeres are the gift that keeps on giving.

              Very true. I have little doubt that there is so much more material out there, much more than when it comes to the "traditional" suspects. And that is a blessing - to potentially have a wealth of evidence lying in wait to be discovered in the exact right spot was always going to be funnier than to dredge the wrong spot for evidence after a hoard of frustrated researchers has already passed by.

              Lechmerology is in many ways still a pristine field.
              "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

              Comment


              • Ripperology = Lechmerolgy

                Comment


                • The skip is still there. So is a metal fence and a security guard who said all requests to enter the site should be made to Murphys in writing. Anything in it will be thoroughly waterlogged by now. The skip company is based in Ruislip.

                  I timed myself walking from 8 BL to the Pinchin Street arch.

                  At a sedate pace: 50 seconds.

                  At a brisk pace: 30 seconds.

                  And that’s the long way round - going across the waste ground at the rear might have been quicker.

                  Comment


                  • The white fence on the right marks 8BL. The second glazed arch on the left is where the torso was deposited.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment



                    • Booth’s notebook 29 contains the results of economic surveys of three distinct areas of St George in the East carried out by three researchers:

                      Miss Martin
                      Mr Dwayne
                      Mr Golding

                      Mr Golding’s survey area was the western half of the St John the Evangelist-in-the-East sub parish bordered by Commercial Road (N), Cable Street (S), Back Church Lane (W) and Christian Street (E). At the end of the survey he provides the total number of families [households] surveyed - 790.

                      Within the 790 there are only 8 references to catsmeat, the two sheds in Backchurch Lane +

                      34, Christian Street: Catsmeat vendor (now in hospital and wife does work Drunken lot

                      60, Berners Street: Catsmeat man helps

                      79, Cable Street: Catsmeat man

                      22, Mary Ann Street: Catsmeat dealer

                      39, Ellen Street: Car reg* Catsmeat shop
                      *Carman regular

                      47, Ellen Street: Paint Catsmeat shop Man has left his wife and allows her a little money


                      I’m not sure what the distinction between a dealer and a vendor would have been, but a catsmeat man would most likely have been someone who went from door to door carrying his stock on a basket or on a small barrow. And my guess, and it is just a guess, is that where Mr Golding mentions a catsmeat shop, the shop is at the location surveyed. That leaves us with the Mary Ann Street ‘dealer’ and the Christian Street ‘vendor’ as the most likely occupiers of the Back Church Lane sheds. (Assuming the occupiers lived in the area surveyed.)

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                        “The question of how conveyed is in the region of theory, for if conveyed by cart, then no limit can be fixed, but if by hand about 250 yards would be the limit; consequently enquiry has been made to find any shed house or place within that limit, so as to ascertain who what, and how the occupier was engaged, but more especially to find the missing parts.

                        Donald Swanson
                        Ch Inspr

                        T Arnold Supd”

                        11th September, 1889


                        It’s interesting that he uses ‘shed’ first before he mentions ‘house’ and the more general ‘place’. Why not warehouse, yard, shop…?

                        Unless the police were completely incompetent, of course they searched the catsmeat sheds in Backchurch Lane and made contact with their ‘occupier’. And if they were in the hands of the Lechmere family, then they would have most likely become aware of the names of Lechmere and/or Forsdike but probably not Cross.











                        thats a good and interesting point Gary!

                        Comment


                        • Back in the day, Robert would have already discovered who the drunken catsmeat vendor of 34, Christian Street was. I’m more of a plodder and can only say at the moment that the house was unoccupied in 1891.

                          Comment


                          • On a side note, in the 1860's a man named Samuel Wildbore, Chemist, worked out of #1 Backchurch Lane. From Robert's research, his wife obtained the property when he died in 1864 (IIRC) then she remarried and moved to Mitre Square.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
                              On a side note, in the 1860's a man named Samuel Wildbore, Chemist, worked out of #1 Backchurch Lane. From Robert's research, his wife obtained the property when he died in 1864 (IIRC) then she remarried and moved to Mitre Square.
                              Thanks Jerry.

                              I think number 1 would have been at the other end of the street at the Commercial Road junction and within Whitechapel.

                              I did come across a report of a quack doctor whose address was supposedly 6BL. That was also in the 1860s.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
                                On a side note, in the 1860's a man named Samuel Wildbore, Chemist, worked out of #1 Backchurch Lane. From Robert's research, his wife obtained the property when he died in 1864 (IIRC) then she remarried and moved to Mitre Square.
                                Wildbore?
                                "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

                                Comment

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