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Charles Lechmere’s Lair?

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  • This is curious. If you compare Arkell’s map of the Jewish East End (below) to the parish map (post 348), you’ll see that the parish of St. John was mainly Jewish in 1899 but the parish of St Matthew was mainly gentile. Our ‘Pinchin Street area’ stands out as predominately red/pink (gentile) amongst the largely blue (Jewish) block of the rest of the north ward of St. George E.

    South of Cable Street, in the southern part of St Matthew’s, Wellclose and Princes (Swedenborg) Squares remained largely gentile, with the two prominent red lines of Shovel Alley particularly standing out (although that may just have been blood ;-))

    Is this just a coincidence, or was there something more significant than I’d supposed about an ecclesiastical parish?

    My counsellor is allowing me one post a day.
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    • It is curious.
      perhaps the area south of Cable Street was differentiated by different housing stock.
      St John's was mostly smallish terraced houses.
      I doubt it was an ecclesiastic parish issue, as ecclesiastical parishes had no local government function by then.

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      • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
        It is curious.
        perhaps the area south of Cable Street was differentiated by different housing stock.
        St John's was mostly smallish terraced houses.
        I doubt it was an ecclesiastic parish issue, as ecclesiastical parishes had no local government function by then.
        Of course, ‘Tiger Bay’ had moved southwards by the 1880s. The formerly notorious enclaves of the north ward, Everard, Henry (Boyd), Brunswick and Frederick Streets had become Jewish and respectable (or demolished in the case of Frederick Street) and the brothels were more concentrated in and around the western end of the Highway, south of Cable Street - Ship Alley, Pennington Street and its ‘Hills’. The rough English and Irish Cockneys clung to their strongholds there. A lot of the houses In Pennington Street were built in the late 17th century, so they were probably on their last legs by then. But that doesn’t explain the situation in our ‘Pinchin Street area’. Was the housing stock there any different from that in the other streets in the north ward that were predominantly Jewish?

        Curioser and curioser …

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        • Over on CB the question has been asked as to why CAL might have moved from James Street to Doveton Street in 1888 - whether it was a better/worse area.

          Well, if we look at Booth, Doveton Street was less desirable than James Street, and the growing family moved out of 6 rooms in James Street to 4 in Doveton Street. So they would appear to have gone down in the world. And, of course, Doveton Street was further away from Broad Street.

          However, by 1899, James Street was predominantly Jewish whereas Doveton Street was predominantly gentile. Perhaps that was a consideration, assuming CAL had some say in the matter.
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          • I saw it erroneously suggested that the Bostocks, his in laws, may have owned Doveton Street property.
            Probably this was a confusion over Bostocks owning the property in Broadway Market that was rented by Charles Lechmere.

            The move to Doveton Street, just before the street murders started, seems strange.
            He went from 22 then to a shop iaroubd the corner in Sceptre Road/Street then back to 24 Doveton Street - over a few years....
            the move occasioned - I think - by drainage works....

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            • Was anti semitism the reason? The geafitti, Lipski?

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              • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                I saw it erroneously suggested that the Bostocks, his in laws, may have owned Doveton Street property.
                Probably this was a confusion over Bostocks owning the property in Broadway Market that was rented by Charles Lechmere.

                The move to Doveton Street, just before the street murders started, seems strange.
                He went from 22 then to a shop iaroubd the corner in Sceptre Road/Street then back to 24 Doveton Street - over a few years....
                the move occasioned - I think - by drainage works....
                Yes, I wondered if the Bostock reference was a mix-up with the Broadway Market property.

                It was also claimed that the Booth map shows Doveton and James Streets on a par. That’s clearly not the case.


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                • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                  Was anti semitism the reason? The geafitti, Lipski?
                  There’s no proof of that obviously, but the area around James street had become progressively more Jewish over the decades since 1861.

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                  • Yes
                    And I can't believe that there wasn't property available to rent much closer to Mary Ann Street had he wanted that location. He was after all a respectable tenant even if he was prone to blocking the drains with human offal.

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                    • In 1881, CAL was living at 20, James Street and his next door neighbour at no. 18 was Geo Hostler, a ginger beer maker. By 1887 no. 18 was empty and there was a ginger beer manufactory and shop at 2, James Street. Next door at no. 4 was a cat’s meat shop. Where better for CAL to have disposed of any knock-off horse flesh he got his hands on?

                      In 1887, when Maria and Joe were at 1, Mary Ann Street, there was a cat’s meat dealer at no. 22.

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                      • Now I suppose I’ll have to trawl through every street in the ‘Greater Pinchin Street Area’ to see how many cat’s meat dealers were there in 1887.

                        I may be some time.

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                        • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                          William Marwood was a public hangman. There’s a saying ‘If Pa killed Ma, who’d kill Pa? Marwood.’

                          Ed may have suspicions that Ma Lechmere bumped off one or more of her bigamously acquired husbands.
                          Thank you.

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                          • As far as I’m aware, CAL’s educational history is unknown. We don’t know, for instance, whether it started in Hereford or London. But judging by what we know of Maria’s background, I would imagine that both he and his sister, Emily, were at school before their mother ‘married’ Thomas Cross. And therefore they would have been registered at one or more schools in the name of Lechmere.

                            ‘Give me a child until he is seven years old, and I will give you the man’ - so say the Jesuits (and Aristotle before them). So at 8 and 10 respectively, when Maria and TC went through a ceremony of marriage, Charles and Emily would have already considered themselves Lechmeres. And no doubt when they received their Christening certificates a year or so later, showing them to be Lechmeres, their Lechmere identity would have been further reinforced.

                            But to get back to their education, at some point after 1858 Charles and Emily would have attended a school in London - presumably in St George in the East. There were a few to choose from (see link), including one built under some railway arches on Upper Chapman Street (image), although that may have been a bit far from Pinchin/Mary Ann Streets.

                            I wonder what route the children took to school, bearing in mind the notorious streets that were nearby. In the 1860s, Pinchin Street did not go as far west as Back Church Lane, it narrowed and became Blacksmiths Arms Place before it entered the lane. Blacksmiths Arms Place and the court which ran off it were narrow, unsanitary and pestilential - they were said to represent a ‘cove or creek of Tiger Bay’. If the children’s school lay to the west of where they lived, they may have had to pass through this ‘cove’.

                            Blacksmith’s Arms Place and Court were demolished to make way for the railway viaduct that contained the infamous Pinchin Street Arch.

                            http://www.stgitehistory.org.uk/media/schools.html

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                            • And did young Charles witness the ferocious Jamrach's Tiger incident of 1857, which started in Betts Street, where his kids later went to school.
                              The victim was eight or nine years old... about the same age as young Charles. Was it one of his playmates?

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                              • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                                And did young Charles witness the ferocious Jamrach's Tiger incident of 1857, which started in Betts Street, where his kids later went to school.
                                The victim was eight or nine years old... about the same age as young Charles. Was it one of his playmates?
                                Ah yes, Jamrach’s tiger.

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