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Charles Lechmere’s Lair?

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  • CAL was very controlled about his form filling.

    Although it is only anecdotal, the Lechmere cat's meat trade ended with the death of TAL and THCL (I shall have to check his baptismal record to make sure of the correct order of those middle initials) at the Bethnal Green Tube Disaster in 1943.

    CAL presumably kept in close contact with the daughter who his mother brought up because (I think this is from memory) he is named on her Marriage certificate as a witness.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

      We may never know. One tiny clue may lie in the fact that her husband’s health had begun to deteriorate from at least early 1889. That period 1888/9 must have been a difficult one. Her old man becoming ill and her son moving to another part of the East End. Then in 1891 she’s moved across the Highway and is running a catsmeat shop alongside her granddaughter. Out of the blue? I suspect not.

      We don’t know what kind of a relationship CAL had with his mother, but assuming he didn’t despise her it’s almost certain that he was involved in her relocation and the setting up of the shop. And his occupation as a carman for Pickfords at Broad Street doesn’t exactly disqualify him from having carried horseflesh on his cart prior to 1889.

      Those who demand absolute proof will consider all of this to be conjectural - trivial according to one poster. But the fact that we can find so many dots for CAL, even if they don’t all join up - makes him an interesting character to research.
      absolutely couldnt agree more. hes exactly the kind of suspect that deserves more attention.

      Comment


      • >>That is a great photo.
        >> What would you say, circa late '40's or '50's?

        >It is!
        >
        >Yes, I think so. I’ve got the details somewhere.

        -- The three films legibly advertised ('First a Girl', 'Student's Romance', 'The Black Room') are all from 1935...

        https://www.jtrforums.com/filedata/fetch?id=584437

        M.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Mark J D View Post
          >>That is a great photo.
          >> What would you say, circa late '40's or '50's?

          >It is!
          >
          >Yes, I think so. I’ve got the details somewhere.

          -- The three films legibly advertised ('First a Girl', 'Student's Romance', 'The Black Room') are all from 1935...

          https://www.jtrforums.com/filedata/fetch?id=584437

          M.
          Thanks, Mark.

          Welcome to the Forums.

          Comment


          • I’ve contacted the Great Eastern Railway Society to see if they can help date the ‘Bill Stickers’ poster. I’m no expert, but the lettering has a Victorian look to me. The GER took over that viaduct in 1866 and they ceased to exist in 1922/3, which narrows things down a bit.

            Comment


            • This discovery shows that there are still hidden corners of the East End that are lying almost untouched... and it is also illustrative of Sod's Law.
              Just before it was found it was being demolished after lying untouched and neglected for decades.
              It should have been treated as an archeological site. It was something of a time capsule.
              Hence the importance of getting down to that skip tomorrow morning... Gary!

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                This discovery shows that there are still hidden corners of the East End that are lying almost untouched... and it is also illustrative of Sod's Law.
                Just before it was found it was being demolished after lying untouched and neglected for decades.
                It should have been treated as an archeological site. It was something of a time capsule.
                Hence the importance of getting down to that skip tomorrow morning... Gary!
                It could have been worse. We could have found it in six month’s time. At least we have what appears to be a photo of the Victorian exterior.

                I doubt they’d let me skip dive on a hard hat site. Unless I bung ‘em a pony or two.

                Comment


                • Take a hard hat or borrow one!
                  Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
                  Who dares wins.
                  This time next year we'll be millionaires Rodders.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                    Take a hard hat or borrow one!
                    Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
                    Who dares wins.
                    This time next year we'll be millionaires Rodders.
                    I perhaps should’ve gone there today.

                    I’ll pop down tomorrow, but I suspect I may be too late.

                    Comment


                    • What I’ve just discovered is that the area in which CAL spent most of his life up to 1888 was a sub-parish of STGITE called St John the Evangelist-in-the-East, a church of that name having been consecrated in Grove Street in 1869.

                      The map below (from the STGITE history site) shows the extent of the sub-parish.

                      http://www.stgitehistory.org.uk/stjohnevangelist.html


                      The Lechmere/Cross/Forsdyke clan lived at a number of addresses in this small area. It was their home patch for three decades:

                      Backchurch Lane
                      Splidts Street/Terrace
                      Thomas/Pinchin Street (twice)
                      Mary Ann Street
                      James Street
                      Cable Street


                      CAL would have known this small area like the back of his hand, especially the sub-district within the sub-parish bordered by Backchurch Lane, Cable Street, Christian Street and Ellen Street. In the 1870s he would have witnessed the construction of the London and Tilbury Railway viaduct that required the demolition of most of the houses in Pinchin Street. Most but not all, one small section of the street survived the railway development, the section that fell within one particular census enumerator’s route:

                      “All that part of the parish of St George in the East which comprises the east side of Philip Street south side of Ellen Street from Philip Street to Elizabeth Street, including Ellen Place West side of Elizabeth Street North side of Thomas Street from Elizabeth Street to Philip Street Both sides of Severn Street Both sides of Mary Ann Street.”

                      That block survived until the early 20th century.

                      The Thomas Street mentioned above would later be renamed Pinchin Street. In 1861 the ‘Cross’ family were living at no. 13, Thomas Street.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • https://www.last.fm/music/Thrashtani...n+Street+Torso

                        ?????

                        Comment


                        • A song about the Pinchin Street Torso... I'm afraid I haven't got Amazon Music so I can't sample the melodic delights contained within.

                          They are half expecting you tomorrow... they open at 7 am.
                          I told the big bloke from Wigan (who seems now to be called Al) that someone might call. He said the earliest the skip will be picked up is 7 but probably later.

                          Of course the German Boot Maker from Suffolk, Forsdike, lived in Splidts Street when he married Old Ma and I think their first house was also on Splidts Street. But this house was demolished when the curved viaduct was built... under which the Torso was deposited. Almost directly under the footprint of the house.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                            A song about the Pinchin Street Torso...
                            Anyone wanna hear old Charlie's signature tune...?
                            https://youtu.be/3g83y1X5jn4

                            M.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                              A song about the Pinchin Street Torso... I'm afraid I haven't got Amazon Music so I can't sample the melodic delights contained within.

                              They are half expecting you tomorrow... they open at 7 am.
                              I told the big bloke from Wigan (who seems now to be called Al) that someone might call. He said the earliest the skip will be picked up is 7 but probably later.

                              Of course the German Boot Maker from Suffolk, Forsdike, lived in Splidts Street when he married Old Ma and I think there first house was also on Splidts Street. But this house was demolished when the curved viaduct was built... under which the Torso was deposited. Almost directly under the footprint of the house.
                              7.00?

                              a.m.???

                              Herr Forsdike had lived in Backchurch Lane with one or more of his previous wives, I think?



                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Mark J D View Post

                                Anyone wanna hear old Charlie's signature tune...?
                                https://youtu.be/3g83y1X5jn4

                                M.
                                That or ‘Underneath the Arches’.

                                Comment

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