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Dr Killeen of Brick Lane

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  • #76
    Questions were asked in the House (Commons) about Killeen:

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    Cork Constitution 29th April, 1890

    I’m not sure what the answers were.

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    • #77
      Killeen seems to have been popular locally, if the length of his funeral cortŤge is anything to go by:

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
        Questions were asked in the House (Commons) about Killeen:

        [ATTACH]21285[/ATTACH]

        Cork Constitution 29th April, 1890

        I’m not sure what the answers were.
        The answers, from Arthur Balfour no less, were:

        The Constabulary authorities report that Dr. Killeen had merely acted under a private arrangement with the previous medical attendant as his locum tenens when the latter was incapacitated through ill health, but be had never been the appointed Constabulary medical attendant of the district. There is no regulation of the nature indicated in the second paragraph. Prior to 1883 some, such regulation did exist, but it was in that year cancelled by the Government of the day, as it was found to work unsatisfactorily. The gentleman appointed in the room of the late medical attendant has been selected by the Constabulary authorities as being, in their opinion, the most suited for the appointment. The reply to the inquiry in the last paragraph is in the affirmative.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
          The answers, from Arthur Balfour no less, were:

          The Constabulary authorities report that Dr. Killeen had merely acted under a private arrangement with the previous medical attendant as his locum tenens when the latter was incapacitated through ill health, but be had never been the appointed Constabulary medical attendant of the district. There is no regulation of the nature indicated in the second paragraph. Prior to 1883 some, such regulation did exist, but it was in that year cancelled by the Government of the day, as it was found to work unsatisfactorily. The gentleman appointed in the room of the late medical attendant has been selected by the Constabulary authorities as being, in their opinion, the most suited for the appointment. The reply to the inquiry in the last paragraph is in the affirmative.
          I would suggest the term ‘most suited’ should have been ‘more suited’ (than Killeen). Killeen, even with the advantages of physical proximity, local knowledge and his complimentary role as MO for the district, was rejected by the police authorities. Why might that have been?

          Ability, perhaps? Politics?

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          • #80
            Congratulations on finding a TRK funeral report. I doubt if there were any politics involved except perhaps petty jealousies etc.

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
              Congratulations on finding a TRK funeral report. I doubt if there were any politics involved except perhaps petty jealousies etc.
              Well, I found a report of an election for a parochial position being contested by a Dr T Killeen and another. Things got a bit fraught and it was mentioned that both men had strong nationalist support. It was in Clare, somewhere, but I didn’t recognise the place name. I’ll see if I can find it again.

              I wonder if Tim got/kept his MO position through his father’s influence? His father was at one time the Hon. Sec. of the Killaniv Dispensary Committee.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                Congratulations on finding a TRK funeral report. I doubt if there were any politics involved except perhaps petty jealousies etc.
                It’s interesting that they speak of Cloonfeigh House. I’ve seen a 2019 death notice of a Biddy Killeen of Clonfeigh House.

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                • #83
                  We know that Tim left just £302 in his will. Probate was granted on 22nd November, 1912. Then in July, 1913 this appeared in the Weekly Freeman:

                  On Sunday night a very largely-attended public demonstration was held at Inch Bridge, a few miles from Ennis, to protest at the treatment of Mrs Killeen, Clonfeigh, a tenant on the Crowe estate, against whom proceedings are being instituted for the non-payment of rent which accrued in the lifetime of her husband, Dr. T. R. Killeen, who died recently.

                  In his lifetime? How much rent did he owe? It sounds like Tim died potless.

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                  • #84
                    Maybe Tim got ill at some point and was trying to pay back the rent slowly.

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                      Maybe Tim got ill at some point and was trying to pay back the rent slowly.
                      Thatís possible. And perhaps his executor was unaware of the rent arrears and thatís why it wasnít settled from his estate.

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                      • #86
                        History

                        The land farmed by the Killeens in Clonfeagh was owned by the Crowe family who were prominent members of the Clare protestant gentry. In the early 19th century it had been leased to a tenant named Daniel Lysaght, who in turn sublet the land to a number of under tenants. The 1825 tithe applotment records show no fewer than 12 farmers occupying 120 acres of land in Clonfeagh Townland. These were clearly small subsistence farmers.

                        When the famine struck in the late 1840s Lysaght was unable to collect the rents from his tenants, and in 1849 Thomas Crowe stepped in and ‘made a clean sweep’ of them. He then farmed the land himself for a couple of years before letting the 272 acres of Clonfeagh to Michael Killeen senior, Timothy Killeen’s grandfather. By 1855 the land was being farmed by Michael Killeen junior, Timothy Killeen’s father.

                        In 1881, Michael Killeen appealed against the level of his rent, but was unsuccessful - the commissioners considered he had been underpaying and actually increased it. The Chairman of the commission stated that ‘it was a mistake for tenants such as Killeen, who held at a fair rent, to come into court and seek to have their rents reduced to nothing.’ And not only was Killeen’s rent increased, he was also ordered to build three new labourers cottages at Clonfeagh at his own expense. This issue rumbled on for years; there was obviously no love lost between the Killeens and the Crowes. It doesn’t surprise me that when he died Tim was in arrears in his rent payments to the Crowes. Nor that they hounded his widow for the debt.



                        In 1894, under the headlines:

                        HOUSE BURNING IN CLARE

                        HOW THE DEVIL’S WORK WAS DONE

                        MORLEY’S POLICE AS SPECTATORS

                        the Irish Daily Independent carried an account of the eviction of a William Killeen in Craganock by his landlord, Francis Wainwright Crowe:

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                        I’ve no idea whether this William Killeen was in any way related to the Killeens of Clonfeagh, but the incident provides us with an insight into the methods of Michael Killeen’s landlord, and the role of the police in these matters. William Killeen was evicted twice, and to make sure he didn’t return, his second house was burned.

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                        • #87
                          Although I’m learning more and more about Tim Killeen, I still don’t feel I have his character pegged.

                          His politics were presumably nationalist, on one occasion he and his father attended a function in honour of Charles Parnell, but was he a firebrand or did he just go with the flow?

                          His rejection by the RIC may well have had something to do with his politics. But equally their objections may have been to his competence.

                          Tiger Tim, or Tim nice but dim?

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                          • #88
                            I don't know, but in the item reporting the protests over the treatment of Tim's widow, there's no mention of Tim's mum, who lived in the same house and was in her 70s. What happened to her?

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                              I don't know, but in the item reporting the protests over the treatment of Tim's widow, there's no mention of Tim's mum, who lived in the same house and was in her 70s. What happened to her?
                              I think she died in 1914, so she would have been still alive. I picked that up from a genealogical site which mentioned a 1914 death notice, but I havenít seen that myself.

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                              • #90
                                Quick, Gary, grab your uke and get busking :


                                https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...n-Commons.html

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