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In The Baner ac Amserau Cymru ( Banner And Times Of Wales )

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  • In The Baner ac Amserau Cymru ( Banner And Times Of Wales )

    Articles found in this Welsh language newspaper.

    Baner ac Amserau Cymru
    Denbigh, Wales
    November 3, 1888
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  • #2
    Baner ac Amserau Cymru
    Denbigh, Wales
    November 24, 1888
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    • #3
      Baner ac Amserau Cymru
      Denbigh, Wales
      December 1, 1888
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      • #4
        Baner ac Amserau Cymru
        Denbigh, Wales
        January 1, 1889
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        • #5
          Baner ac Amserau Cymru
          Denbigh, Wales
          April 10, 1889
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          • #6
            NOVEMBER 3, 1888

            WREXHAM - A threat to behave like "Jack the Ripper" - In the Police Court of this town, on Tuesday 30th inst. [sic: ult.], John Mack and Thomas Owen were accused of assaulting Mrs Maria Richards, wife of Frederick Richards, of the Blossoms Hotel, Wrexham. According to the testimony given to the court, Mack and Owen went together with several others to the hotel, on the 27th of October. Mr Richards refused to serve them liquor, whereupon the accused attacked her [Mrs Richards], beating her, and threatening to act like "Jack the Ripper" towards her. Owen was freed, and Mack was sent to prison with hard labour for four months.
            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

            "Suche Nullen"
            (F. Nietzsche)

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            • #7
              NOVEMBER 24, 1888

              CRIMES AND ACCIDENTS [yup, that's what it says!]

              ANOTHER ATROCITY IN LONDON

              ATTEMPT AT MURDER

              The capital city is once again disturbed and horrified by what appears to be a continuation, or a resumption, of the last terrible atrocities which were perpetrated in parts of London. About ten o'clock on Wednesday morning, 21st inst., an attempted murder took place at a lodging-house in George Street, Whitechapel, not far from where the last wrathful murder of the series of murders took place. According to emerging reports of this murderous attempt, the facts are approximately as follows. A woman of low character, Annie Farmer, had met in Whitechapel a man of decent appearance, in good clothing of dark cloth, apparently 36 years old. They met last Wednesday morning, and went to several public houses; later, around 10 o'clock, they went to a common lodging-house in George Street, Spitalfields, where they took a double-room to themselves, to which they repaired.

              It appeared that the woman was to some extent under the influence of alcohol, but the man was completely sober. About 10 o'clock, a scream was heard from the room they occupied; soon afterwards, she was heard trying to leave the room, shouting that the man had tried to murder her. After the man went out, he ran away as fast as he could; by this time the cries of the woman were drawing more attention than the man who'd fled, and he got away without anyone knowing what became of him. A policeman and a doctor immediately arrived at the house, 19 George Street, and people gathered by their thousands in the street where the murderous assault took place, as well as in the surrounding streets, screaming "Jack the Ripper". After the physician Dr Phillips arrived, he found that the woman's throat had been cut in two places, although the wounds were neither deep nor dangerous.

              After the wounds had been treated as best as they could, the woman was taken to the police station in Commercial Street. Since she was under the effects of alcohol, and had experienced such a shock, she could provide few details about the assault - until the afternoon, when she said that she'd known the man for about a year, and that she'd socialised with him previously on different occasions; however, she only knew a little about him.

              Esther Hall, the woman who occupies, and owns, 19 George Street, told a London reporter that, when she heard the cry of murder, she went up to the room and found Annie Farmer in the bed, blood running from two wounds in her throat; she asked her what had happened, she responding that she'd fallen asleep, only to be awakened by feeling her throat being cut by the man, who was in bed with her; he leapt from the bed, and off down the stairs he went. She tried to follow him, but failed.

              It's expected that the police will find this man very soon, since so many had seen him, and since he could not have fled too far from the scene where his attempt at murder took place.
              Kind regards, Sam Flynn

              "Suche Nullen"
              (F. Nietzsche)

              Comment


              • #8
                DECEMBER 1, 1888

                Jack the Ripper in distress. - In Aberdare Police Court on Tuesday, Miriam Howells, wife of a Penrhiwceiber labourer named James Howells, was accused of sending letters in the name of "Jack the Ripper" to Elizabeth Magor and Margaret Smith, threatening to take their lives. The accused admitted her guilt, and entreated the Bench to overlook her crime for the moment, as she had meant no harm. The trial was suspended for a week.
                Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                "Suche Nullen"
                (F. Nietzsche)

                Comment


                • #9
                  JANUARY 1, 1889

                  The owners and editor of a Belgian newspaper published in Brussels, together with others in that city, have received letters, postcards and telegrams, signed by one calling himself "Jack the Ripper", stating his intention to visit Brussels soon, intending to murder women in the same manner as he had in London, only a short time ago; this has caused a not-insignificant fear among the girls of the capital city of Belgium.
                  Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                  "Suche Nullen"
                  (F. Nietzsche)

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                  • #10
                    A tongue-in-cheek article

                    APRIL 10, 1889

                    HUYTON QUARRY, LIVERPOOL

                    Last week, a number of the fine young men and women of Huyton Quarry summoned enough strength to put in jail a man who had caused a great deal of stress and trouble to us Welsh in that area. No Spring Heeled Jack nor Jack the Ripper was he, but one "Dick Sin Dafydd".

                    A special assizes were announced for his trial, and the chief judge - Sir Lover of Justice - was appointed to sit on the Bench. The prosecutor was Mr Keen Politeness, and Mr Slipshod Mercy defended. Twelve senior jurists recorded the proceedings, and 19 different witnesses were questioned and cross-examined. During the trial, Thrush Dyfrdwy, Rhydwen Esda, Finch Ucheldref and Nightingale of Don sung a number of songs related to the accusation. Of course, the prisoner was found guilty; but he was put into the hands of mercy, to reappear in a year's time, if he hasn't by then reformed.

                    It has emerged that the "trial" was the work of Rev SJ Roberts, Huyton's minister, which he composed especially to make the youth of the area better Welshmen and Welshwomen, and more devoted to goodness.

                    [Translator's Note: Dic Sin Dafydd is the equivalent of "Uncle Tom", namely, a Welshman who looks on his heritage with contempt, spurning his culture and language in order to "get on in the world". Evidently, the Welsh-speaking youth of Huyton, Liverpool, were heading down the same slippery slope. The entertainment to which the article refers seems to have been an early sort of "community rock-opera" to get the kids working together in Welsh.]
                    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                    "Suche Nullen"
                    (F. Nietzsche)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A hearty handclasp and backpat to Gareth for the terrific transcribin' !!

                      Baner ac Amserau Cymru
                      Denbigh, Wales
                      August 15, 1888
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                      • #12
                        Baner ac Amserau Cymru
                        Denbigh, Wales
                        September 5, 1888
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                        • #13
                          Baner ac Amserau Cymru
                          Denbigh, Wales
                          September 12, 1888
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                          • #14
                            Baner ac Amserau Cymru
                            Denbigh, Wales
                            September 12, 1888
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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the translations, Gareth!

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