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  • Magpie
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
    Our regular Sunday tea was 'shrimps and winkles': a pint of brown shrimps, ditto of winkles, brown bread and butter and sticks of celery followed by a slice or two of Battenburg and lashings of Rosie Lee.
    Used to love winkles. My dad would come home from the pub on a Sunday with a container of jellied eels for himself and a small pot of winkles for me.

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Originally posted by String View Post
    Never mind this shit they’ve taken the fudge out of selection boxes. Where’s my torch and pitch fork.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/o...-a3725591.html
    Maybe they save millions of dollars by substituting an Oreo based biscuit thing for fudge which would contain more expensive ingredients.

    Oreos show up in everything here. They are good but it seems like there are too many things that now contain them.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Our Christmas starter is usually something seafoody. Smoked salmon/mousse and prawns this year.

    Roast potatoes for the main course, with all the trimmings: turkey, beef veg, devils on horseback etc.

    Then for me a tiny Christmas pud from M&S smothered in Madagascan vanilla custard. I'm the only one who eats Christmas pud in our house.

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
    Don't forget the laverbread!
    Not half! Food of the gods!

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    I bloody love winkles, me! All shellfish, come to think of it, even whelks; in fact, I think I'll call into Swansea Market on the way home and buy some
    Don't forget the laverbread!

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    I bloody love winkles, me! All shellfish, come to think of it, even whelks; in fact, I think I'll call into Swansea Market on the way home and buy some
    Not whelks, anything but whelks!

    When I was 14 or so I had a Sunday morning job in Billingsgate market removing whelks from their shells. Bloody hard work in a cold, wet basement. Good money, though. The most off-putting thing was the slimy foamy stuff (reproductive?) that many of them exuded. Yuk!

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
    Our regular Sunday tea was 'shrimps and winkles'
    I bloody love winkles, me! All shellfish, come to think of it, even whelks; in fact, I think I'll call into Swansea Market on the way home and buy some

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Battenburg, with hopefully the squares not falling apart.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Our regular Sunday tea was 'shrimps and winkles': a pint of brown shrimps, ditto of winkles, brown bread and butter and sticks of celery followed by a slice or two of Battenburg and lashings of Rosie Lee.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    I used to do a double-take at the lyrics:

    "A finger of Fudge is just enough to give your kids a treat,
    A finger of Fudge is just enough until it's time to eat..."

    What they were saying, of course, was that it was a good snack to sustain you until tea-time, but it could also be read to mean that Fudge seems like a good idea until you actually bite into it.
    An uncle of mine misheard the Fairy Liquid jingle 'Hands that do dishes...' and asked 'Why judicious?'

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Caroline Brown View Post
    We used to snigger at the "finger of fudge" bit.
    I used to do a double-take at the lyrics:

    "A finger of Fudge is just enough to give your kids a treat,
    A finger of Fudge is just enough until it's time to eat..."

    What they were saying, of course, was that it was a good snack to sustain you until tea-time, but it could also be read to mean that Fudge seems like a good idea until you actually bite into it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Caroline Brown
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    On the subject of Cadbury's Fudge, it was decades before I found out that the boy soprano on the adverts was singing not "It's full of peppery goodness", but "It's full of Cadbury goodness..."

    Makes more sense when you think about it.
    We used to snigger at the "finger of fudge" bit.

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    I used to think it was peppery goodness too.


    Pop lyrics are another one : Ashes to Ashes by Bowie - "Do you remember a Galosphere?"

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    On the subject of Cadbury's Fudge, it was decades before I found out that the boy soprano on the adverts was singing not "It's full of peppery goodness", but "It's full of Cadbury goodness..."

    Makes more sense when you think about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by String View Post
    Never mind this shit they’ve taken the fudge out of selection boxes. Where’s my torch and pitch fork.
    I guess all the nation's supplies of fudge have been sequestered by the government.

    Leave a comment:

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