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  • Jack the Name

    Browsing the Old Bailey Online, I came across a reference to someone called Smoakey Jack. It made me wonder how many other Jack nicknames were out there, so I wasted an hour or two finding out.

    Jack Ketch and Jack Sheppard are mentioned on numerous occasions and there are endless examples of Jack (usually for John) as a straightforward forename.

    The following selection are nicknames, with the exception of the last, which is apparently the genuine name of a OB defendant.

    Smoaky/Smoakey Jack
    Smoaking Jack
    Black Guard Jack
    Ballad-singing Jack
    Mollying Jack
    Jack the Hatter
    Nimble Jack
    Moco Jack
    Gartering Jack
    Fishy Jack
    Country Jack
    Parliament Jack
    Scotch Jack
    Irish Jack
    Jack the Catcher
    Captain Jack
    Black Jack
    Jack the Sailor
    Jack Ragg
    Giffling/Gissling Jack
    Marlborough Jack
    Jack the Taylor
    Spanish Jack
    Gallows Jack
    Battersea Jack
    Blind Jack the Kidnapper
    Hell Fire Jack
    Yankee Jack
    Banbury Jack
    Jack the Painter
    Brick Lane Jack
    Jack the Gardener
    Jubilee Jack
    Mad Jack
    Spoony Jack
    Jack the Barber
    Fat Jack
    Turnpike Jack
    Kingston Jack
    Jack the Matseller
    Jack the Baker
    Long Jack
    Jack Straw
    Stuttering Jack
    Jack a Dandy
    Jack the Sweep
    Saucy Jack
    Louse Jack
    Jack in the Green
    Lancashire Jack
    Jack Fat
    Double-jointed Jack
    Sailor Jack
    Three-fingered Jack
    Carotty Jack
    Cast Iron Jack
    Brighton Jack
    Jack the Tinker
    Jack in the Water
    Finality Jack
    Jack the Brickmaker
    Young Jack
    Old Jack
    Bony Jack
    Fancy Jack
    Little Jack
    Happy Jack
    Curly Jack
    Cheap Jack
    Flash Jack
    Scandalous Jack
    Donkey Jack
    Italian Jack
    Watercress Jack
    Jack Firelock
    Spanker Jack
    Muffin Jack
    Naphtha Jack
    Brockley Jack
    Coffee Jack
    Ice Cream Jack
    Navy Jack
    Jack the Spaniard
    Jack the Ripper
    Jack Welfare
    Cokey Jack
    Ginger Jack
    Jack the Ponce

    JACK ASSED

  • #2
    Gartering Jack

    Defended himself against a not too well briefed Thieftaker's nark it would seem.

    Click image for larger version

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    • #3
      Mollying Jack etc

      Another nark, Nimble Jack, peaching on two others, Mollying Jack and a Jack the Hatter.

      http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/brows...Jack#highlight

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      • #4
        Elizabeth Jackson's boyfriend, John Faircloth deserted the army and went missing for 7 years, he became known as 'Lancashire Jack' as that's where he hid out. He was originally from Ely.

        That's long list, Gary!

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        • #5
          Blind Jack the Kidnapper

          Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
          Elizabeth Jackson's boyfriend, John Faircloth deserted the army and went missing for 7 years, he became known as 'Lancashire Jack' as that's where he hid out. He was originally from Ely.

          That's long list, Gary!
          Did he have Lancashire roots? Faircloth sounds like a phonetic version of Fairclough, which sounds Lancashirey to me.

          It is a long list. Some of the stories attached to them are quite interesting. Blind Jack the Kidnapper puts me in mind of Blind Pugh. He seems to have been part of a press gang, unless that was just a front for robbery.

          http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/brows...pper#highlight

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
            Did he have Lancashire roots? Faircloth sounds like a phonetic version of Fairclough, which sounds Lancashirey to me.

            It is a long list. Some of the stories attached to them are quite interesting. Blind Jack the Kidnapper puts me in mind of Blind Pugh. He seems to have been part of a press gang, unless that was just a front for robbery.

            http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/brows...pper#highlight
            Copying a recovered post by Debra at Casebook in an Elizabeth Jackson thread --

            Debra A. 23rd December 2006, 06:48 PM

            I was looking at John Faircloth earlier, the man who lived with Elizabeth until shortly before her death and was said to have 'ill used her'. His real name was Smith Faircloth and he was born and lived in March Cambridgeshire for most of his life and so did his family, but interestingly, he did have one brother living in Horsleydown...the area where some of Elizabeth's remains were discovered.
            Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
            https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

            Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
            Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

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            • #7
              Edwards. One of the jury has known me a great many years, and can speak to my character.
              Juryman. I have known you to be a vile, wicked fellow, I believe.

              Shot himself in the foot there. Who needs enemies?!

              Three men indicted for stealing a silk hankie and being tried at the Old Bailey!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris G. View Post
                Copying a recovered post by Debra at Casebook in an Elizabeth Jackson thread --

                Debra A. 23rd December 2006, 06:48 PM

                I was looking at John Faircloth earlier, the man who lived with Elizabeth until shortly before her death and was said to have 'ill used her'. His real name was Smith Faircloth and he was born and lived in March Cambridgeshire for most of his life and so did his family, but interestingly, he did have one brother living in Horsleydown...the area where some of Elizabeth's remains were discovered.
                Thanks, yes that's right, Ely/March born and bred for generations.

                I wonder what the meaning of Faircloth/clough is? They must be related names just with a North/South divide. You'd think a 'cloth' to be more at home up North and 'clough' in the posher South

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
                  Thanks, yes that's right, Ely/March born and bred for generations.

                  I wonder what the meaning of Faircloth/clough is? They must be related names just with a North/South divide. You'd think a 'cloth' to be more at home up North and 'clough' in the posher South
                  I thought clough was a northern dialect word for a narrow valley.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                    I thought clough was a northern dialect word for a narrow valley.
                    It probably is.

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                    • #11
                      Quite a list, Gary ! Thanks buddy !!
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                      • #12
                        I have been curious about Faircloth (or Fairclough) also. I knew some people named Clough and they pronounced it "clock". I will now hopefully attach a clipping from a surname database.
                        Attached Files
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                        • #13
                          Hi Anna,

                          The usual English pronunciation of clough today is 'cluff' in the south and 'cloof' in the north.

                          Gary

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                            Hi Anna,

                            The usual English pronunciation of clough today is 'cluff' in the south and 'cloof' in the north.

                            Gary
                            It's ' cluff' in my part of the north too, Gary.

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                            • #15
                              Hi Debs,

                              Three northern (by my reckoning) gentlemen discussing the sacking of the football manager Brian Clough. The interviewer, Austin Mitchell, pronounces his name 'cluff', Don Revie pronounces it differently. Don Revie's version was what I was trying to describe as 'cloof'.

                              https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yJHvg5c7vPE

                              Gary

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