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New Deadly Virus is Spreading/ Covid19 Pandemic 2020

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  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
    The medical details are what interest me. Politicians and media, probably depending on the old standby, 'If it bleeds, it leads', depended on the most extreme calculations of illness and death to motivate populations to suddenly stop normal life. The numbers seem to have been miscalculated. Meanwhile researchers are just learning about this new virus.

    I'm curious about why you think the assumptions were extreme, or why you think they were miscalculated.


    Essentially the assumptions were that in normal life each infection would produce 2-3 other infections and that something on the order of 1% of those infected would die. And there was negligible immunity in the population to start with. Those figures imply, without any speculative calculations, that if nothing had been done around 0.6% of the population would have been killed by the virus - 400,000 people in the UK, 2 million in the USA and so on.


    We've managed to avoid that so far by limiting the spread of the virus through extreme precautions, but I don't see any evidence against those assumptions about the properties of the virus. On the death rate, 0.25% of the entire population of New York is reported to have died of the virus already. In the UK, serology tests reportedly indicate something like 10% (plus or minus) have been infected. The official death toll is 30,000, but it's been calculated there have been 50,000 more deaths than usual, and the rate of decline implies those figures will end up at least 50% bigger. Sadly all those data are consistently with a fatality rate of around 1%.


    A lot of people seem to be saying now that the counter-measures were all unnecessary, because a lot fewer people died than had been expected to die if we'd taken no counter-measures. To my mind that seems to be like saying a cancer operation was unnecessary because you had the operation and you didn't die after all.

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    That 'pinging' off a tower.....uh, wouldn't that also pick up folks passing by? Don't those phones search for the 'next' tower if the closest one isn't available, for instance? I'm as technologically ignorant as always but I've heard something like that.

    I don't know that the whole thing sorts out to socialism or corporate capitalism. There are lots of things I don't know and I want to know more. There are a lot of things that look insane to me but nobody talks about them.

    I told one of my financial advisers back in January I believed there was a plan to crash the economy. He said if people would start buying again, it would be OK.

    That really made an impression on a couple of levels. We see one side of society or politics howling about the environment. On the other side we see consumers encouraged to BUY, BUY, BUY! Throw away what they got last month and buy more! Lots of the stuff we're encouraged to BUY & throw away is just crap we don't need. (BTW, I don't live this way.)

    IMO, we can't have an environmentally conscious world which is expected to BUY & throw away!

    I had thought the massive meat packing and agricultural businesses had to do with better distribution and do-called 'food security'. It looks like worldwide populations are so huge and so many live crammed into asphalt lined cities that a planned and managed food supply is probably needed? I also thought this big agriculture had to do with better food distribution around the world so there would be fewer starving people. I don't claim to know much but these are thoughts I have had.

    I am a self-sufficient, prepped person. My best friend has been nagging me to go in with her and buy half a beef locally. I think we're settling on buffalo. (American bison also raised locally.) My freezers are already full of lamb and game meat but my friends don't want to share those delicacies. (Probably like How's freezers are full of scrapple which no one wants to share.)

    I can plant a garden and fish in the river out my back door. If I want to battle predators I can have chickens which make eggs and a cow or goats which produce milk. (The young foxes and coyotes on my land are cute and I know they'd do something unfortunate to chickens. Not to mention the nesting hawks in the trees.) I still pick up onion spills along the road. The beautiful onions raised around here all go to the onion ring factories like Ore-Ida and we can't buy these wonderful things in the stores.

    But what about people in the cities? We're long past the time when everyone could dream of 20 acres and a mule. If we did that now we'd have city folk trying to raise vegetables in the limestone cliffs out here. So what do we do?

    I hope the present crisis will encourage people to save and not buy so much garbage which they will throw away in a month. Maybe if the insane buying can be slowed, environmental impacts will be decreased and folks will be more family centered.

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  • R. J. Palmer
    replied
    The following image shows how dangerously interconnected the world has become. There is a giant meat packing plant in Cass County, Indiana, that has reported roughly 240 cases of Covid-19 among its employees (the local health department said the number was closer to 890). Anyway, the plant has its own cell phone tower. If you visit the plant, your phone will “ping” that tower. They then ran a study to see what other cell phone towers were “pinged” by those same phones over the next 30 days, to see what the potential would be for spreading disease. Within a month, all 48 states on the continent, as well as Canada, had been visited by someone who had been inside just that one meat plant in rural Indiana. Obviously, a lot of these visitors would have been truck drivers, sales reps, etc.

    From the standpoint of disease control, there's too many of us, food production has become too concentrated in massive factories, and we're too damned mobile as a species.

    I'm not worried about 'socialism.' I'm worried about corporate capitalism that demands endless 'growth'--as if growth is a good thing
    Attached Files

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    The medical details are what interest me. Politicians and media, probably depending on the old standby, 'If it bleeds, it leads', depended on the most extreme calculations of illness and death to motivate populations to suddenly stop normal life. The numbers seem to have been miscalculated. Meanwhile researchers are just learning about this new virus.

    I see it all very differently. For a couple decades now, my friends and I have talked about seasonal diseases. Used to be, we say, you'd get flu or colds and you pretty much knew what you had. (There were still some 'childhood diseases' around too.) Anyway, you'd get sick, get over it and go on living. In the last couple decades we have noticed outbreaks of especially severe, supposed viral illnesses that severely sicken many for weeks and months and cripple a few. What are these things? I can say for certain that NOBODY, from the doctors to the CDC, gives a damn! I have written letters and done other things and never even gotten replies. Maybe they need to start paying attention.

    The laundry list of signs and symptoms for COVID described in this video does not surprise me. Just about every year around here we get "viral" outbreaks with most of these symptoms. The difference is COVID kills and maims more efficiently.

    I am not suggesting whatever we have experienced in these past twenty-some years is COVID or even a corona virus. Nobody knows and apparently nobody wants to know. Those who do not fully recover are still sent to psychiatrists or drugged with anti-depressants or anti-psychotics!

    What the heck has been circulating in the world prior to COVID that causes such devastating diseases? Enquiring minds want to know!

    (Concerning what COVID does to blood I now have a very deep curiosity about a family member who died years ago due to sudden blood clots in intestines.)

    Concerning protocols for opening economies and societies, IMO the pertinent questions are about how much permanent disability is acceptable. COVID may kill older people but it maims younger ones. If masks and distancing help even a little bit, those things are worth doing.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=KzKvIYwqQkE&t=600s

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    Reminds me of a graffito on a lift (elevator) door at my university, which read Procrastinate NOW!!!

    We must be about the same age. I remember that one.

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