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New Deadly Virus is Spreading/ Covid19 Pandemic 2020

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  • Caroline Brown
    replied
    I suspected this would be the case, Chris, and I've not had so much as a sniffle since before the first lockdown.

    When we watched the televised cricket test matches a couple of months back, between India and England, my other half and I were shocked by the crowds of spectators, packed closely together, many not wearing masks, and clearly enjoying their freedom as if the pandemic was over for India. We knew that cases had been dropping faster than in other parts of the world after their first wave, but we predicted this latest explosion, because the virus was being given free rein to roam through the population and produce new, more efficient and transmissible variants.

    A lesson to be learned about the deadly dangers of complacency.

    Love,

    Caz
    X

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  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Originally posted by Phillip Walton View Post
    Its not comparing the present pandemic with the 1918-19 flu pandemic its comparing flu deaths on a year by year basis. The year 2020 showed a considerable drop in the number deaths from flu. The fact that some flu deaths may have been recorded as covid related has to be taken into account. As for India it has to be taken into account the extraordinary rapidity with which corvid mutates not helped by the lack of social distancing and not wearing masks.
    Flu is less transmissible than coronavirus. It's not surprising that the same precautions intended to suppress the transmission of coronavirus have had an even more dramatic effect on flu cases.

    Actually, I would say the opposite of what you seem to be suggesting. The number of deaths from flu has decreased because the transmission of flu has been squashed by the anti-COVID measures. So when people estimate the true COVID fatality rate by looking at number of excess deaths (compared with the seasonal average), the flu factor is going to cause that estimate to err on the low side. Because allowing for fewer flu deaths, the seasonal average should be lower.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Just as an aside....Nina is on the Safety Committee at work and has been for 6 years. She just told me that at no time during the past year has anyone at our place of work come down with the regular, garden variety, flu.

    In fact, employee absenteeism, a little above average, is a direct consequence of people having to re-arrange their normal routines, particularly those who depended on day-care and who have small children at home.

    Management has been ultra-tolerant about this development and has yet to confer with anyone about time missed. They understand the gravity of the situation, most having children of their own.

    On the other hand, we've had eight employees ( 2 Hispanic, 2 White, 4 Asian) workers who have acquired the Covid virus and they were tested positive in all 8 cases..

    I believe that wearing masks has contributed to the below average number of Americans coming down with the flu, without the shadow of a doubt.

    Wear your masks, people.

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  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    Its not comparing the present pandemic with the 1918-19 flu pandemic its comparing flu deaths on a year by year basis. The year 2020 showed a considerable drop in the number deaths from flu. The fact that some flu deaths may have been recorded as covid related has to be taken into account. As for India it has to be taken into account the extraordinary rapidity with which corvid mutates not helped by the lack of social distancing and not wearing masks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    It's worth bearing in mind that mostly the COVID-19 fatality rates we've seen so far, bad though they are, have reflected what happens when adequate intensive care is available. Tragically, we have seen in parts of Brazil and I think we are about to see in India what can happen when it is not.

    The only meaningful comparison with flu is with the pandemic of 1918-1919,which was the worst in modern history.

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  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    I think that the flu deaths here in the UK are quite accurately recorded. This is down to only one single organisation, the NHS being responsible for collecting the figures. But because they have been produced for many years people tend to take little notice of them.

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    The last time I closely followed COVID research, it was thought and hoped the death rate would stay around .63% . Phillip W. was correct to point out the death rate is much higher, now 2% in USA. I am sure that is higher in developing countries. (IMO, there will be other COVID-linked deaths in future as people with some of the long term effects succumb.)

    Interestingly, I found some sites that directly compared COVID and influenza deaths in the U.S. Direct comparisons cannot be made because influenza deaths have always been ESTIMATED, according to these sources. There were some examples of how such things are estimated. (To which I would suggest that where I used to live, nobody gave a damn so probably only those who died in hospital were counted. IMO, the influenza death rate may be much higher. Medical "officials" in that area always wrote off nursing home deaths and other deaths among the elderly as "expected" so I assume they were not counted. Also in Oregon, there has been a lot of political pressure to list smoking as a cause of death if the deceased EVER smoked. A family member who lived to great old age, who lived the lifespan of his family, who had once smoked, had smoking as cause of death on the death certificate!)

    This maybe also explains some accusations about the COVID case counts, including deaths in the beginning. Before there was accurate testing, there were allegations that guesses were made and deaths were counted that had nothing to do with COVID. Close friends of mine claim an elderly relative who never left her apartment and had little contact with the outside world, who died suddenly in her apartment, was declared a COVID death with nothing to back it up.

    Then there are the many illnesses in my geographical area, November through December 2019, which were never counted. Doctors now say these illnesses were COVID, including what my household and I experienced.

    My main point is, God knows the influenza rates and deaths in the US because these are always "estimated". Concerning COVID, I am shocked about the people I knew personally who have died and who have become very ill. In my personal circle, cautious, healthy-living people died or became very ill. Those with unhealthy habits barely got sick. It also looks to me like the virus in my area became more deadly over the past year.

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    It looks like there is plenty of vaccine here in Idaho and Oregon.

    Lots of my friends have had the vaccine, mostly Pfizer. Some of these people are old, have severe allergies and other issues. All of these people have done well with the vaccines. (It is true I have a fairly solitary life so we are not talking hundreds of people.)

    Then there are some people outside my circle who have stories of legs swelling and turning black and blue, migraine appearing for the first time and not stopping, and other odd things. I have no idea why these vaccines possibly cause more severe signs in some. If other vaccines did this the anti-vaxxers would be louder than they are.

    Of interest to me is that the vaccine does not seem to be linked to neurological complications--other than migraine--at this time. I don't get vaccines because of a reaction I have had to vaccines after having Guillain Barre, a paralysis that can follow infectious illnesses.

    I will try a new medication to control migraine and then get a vaccine. My doctors and I agree that the vaccine is important and they say they will be supportive if something goes wrong. (Where I used to live, if something unusual went wrong with anything, the patient was eventually sent to the mental health clinic. Those doctors didn't think outside the book, let alone the box.)

    I would expect anything that stirs up the immune system could make arthritis worse for a while. That's good to think about. My dog injured me this winter by running into me from behind at full force and knocking me down on frozen ground. I still have a lot of extra pains and discomforts.

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  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Originally posted by Phillip Walton View Post

    Several people of my acquaintance who have arthritis have said it is worse since they had the jab.
    The only way to tell whether that's cause and effect or just coincidence is to do the kind of large trial - including tens of thousands of people, one group injected with the vaccine and another with the placebo - that always happens before a vaccine is approved.

    I haven't heard of any arthritis-related problems being picked up by those trials. No doubt any but extremely rare side-effects (like the blood-clotting issue) would have been picked up and publicised mercilessly by anti-vaccine propagandists.

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  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

    Are you sure about that?

    I've never heard it said, and I've just looked at the information about vaccines on several arthritis websites, and still can't see any mention of it.
    Several people of my acquaintance who have arthritis have said it is worse since they had the jab.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Cazzie

    Nina had the Moderna so she has to wait 28 days.

    I had the Pfizer...I have to wait 21.days.

    She started feeling shitty last night and stayed home today. My brother had the Moderna, too...and it made him out of sorts.

    I received 2 emails from local pharmacies yesterday stating they had vaccine and available appointments. Maybe things are picking up around here.

    Pennsylvania' policy is what made it rough getting shots. Counties with small populations got the same volume of vaccine as large ones, like ours.

    Be well, babe. Xxxxxx

    Leave a comment:


  • Caroline Brown
    replied
    Hi Howie,

    Here in the UK, the second jab is typically given 10-12 weeks after the first, but it may depend on which vaccine you have.

    I had my first on Feb 20, and am not expecting my second until early May.

    Love,

    Caz
    X

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    I get my second poke on Wednesday.....Nina had her first one today.

    My arm still hurts...been 19 days since I got the jab....but it's tolerable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Originally posted by Phillip Walton View Post
    The increase in arthritis is apparently quite common after the vaccine.
    Are you sure about that?

    I've never heard it said, and I've just looked at the information about vaccines on several arthritis websites, and still can't see any mention of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    I will be having that second jab. I look upon the arthritis as an indicator that the vaccine is working. The increase in arthritis is apparently quite common after the vaccine.

    Leave a comment:

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