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Malvina Haynes : Another Whitechapel Outrage

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  • Malvina Haynes : Another Whitechapel Outrage

    The Echo
    April 9, 1888
    ***********


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  • #2
    Great minds think alike eh, How? Methinks we have been searching in the same places for similar reasons...Ms. Haynes was on my list of cases to bring up today, although I don't have access to scans of the actual 'papers - are they your own? I will have a look to see whether I have any different editions to add to this thread later.

    I am yet to find any reference to whether the assailant was ever caught, or whether the woman recovered. Have you had any more luck? Nothing in the Old Bailey archives.

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    • #3
      Malvina Haynes
      1881
      White Horse Inn, 67 Cardigan Street, Oxford
      Head: Henry Haynes aged 28 born Oxford - Painter
      Wife: Malvina Haynes aged 26 born Ramsden, Oxford - Tailoress
      Children:
      Charles H aged 2 born Oxford

      Marriage:
      1873 Quarter 3
      Henry Haynes married Malvina Shaylor

      1871:
      53 Post Office Street, South Hinksey, Berks
      Head: Rueben Shaylor aged 45 born Thackley, Oxon - Plasterer
      Wife: Sarah Shaylor aged 42 born Bampton, Oxon - Dressmaker
      Children:
      Malvina aged 16 born Ramsden - Tailoress
      Mark aged 14 born Ramsden - Messenger for solicitor
      Brian aged 9 born Ramsden
      Milicent aged 7 born Ramsden

      1891 listing:
      252 Katherine Buildings, Cartwright Street, Aldgate
      Head: Henry Haynes aged 38 born Oxford - Painter
      Wife: Malvina Haynes aged 37 born Ramsden
      Child:
      Charles aged 11 born Oxford

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      • #4
        Attacks and stabbings

        Hello all,

        I have a question that perhaps someone can answer.
        Have we a complete list over all attacks with a knife or stabbings upon women in Whitechapel in 1888, that did not result in death for the victim?
        Reason.. title of this newspaper clip and the inference that Whitechapel is becoming so dangerous.

        Many thanks

        best wishes

        Phil
        from 1905...to 19.05..it was written in the stars

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        • #5
          Pop over to the 'debate' thread Phil as there is one taking shape over there, to which I will be adding later. My access to newspaper archives is somewhat limited and so I am sure others will add more, too.

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          • #6
            Thanks a lot for the additional material,Senor Scott !

            Trevor...I wasn't in a rush to look into this particular incident last night...as the other one in May...that of Georgina Green...was where Nina's and my efforts were focused for quite a while last night.
            Another reason is that,unlike Malvina Haynes, there is no mention of Georgina Green elsewhere aside from Chris's census listing.
            Yeah...I guess we were on the same wave length yesterday,Trev.

            I wonder in looking at the article again this morning at what time this assault of Malvina Haynes took place...being married and all...and under a railway arch with what appears to have been (at least) a man who was not her husband.
            My suspicious nose smells an attack on a woman engaged in prostitution.

            Could these cases...going back to Millwood's...and including the Haynes/Green incidents...be the early and crude work of the Whitechapel Murderer ...or one-off's ?

            Haynes survived according to Chris Scott's census listing...but was in bad shape there for a while. So was Millwood... but who succumbed for a different reason....and this Green definitely needs to be looked into.
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            • #7
              Trevor:

              Sorry for not answering your question !
              If you are asking me whether we can put scans of the Haynes incident on another thread or if you want to stash them for yourself, by all means do so...that goes for all attachments on JTRForums that I put up that are not provided by another member. For permission in regard to something someone else puts up, we need to ask them first.

              Casebook has a story and short thread on the incident...and I was just now checking what they have.


              http://www.casebook.org/press_report...ost880414.html

              http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=1309
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              • #8
                Hi guys
                Here is her birth entry - still looking for when she died
                Name: Malvina Shayler
                Year of Registration: 1854
                Quarter of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep
                District: Witney
                County: Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire

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                • #9
                  Actually How, what I meant was where are you getting the images from? Is it a pay archive, or some corner of the web I am yet to discover?

                  And yes Chris, I have spent a good 6hrs+ over the whole day today looking for ANY of this family post 1891, and it is most curious - the whole lot of them seem to disappear completely off the face of the earth. I have a few 'Malvinas' with different (presumably, if it is our lady, remarried) which I cannot at present rule out, but I think the chances are extremely slim. If it wasn't such an unusual name I probably wouldn't even entertain the thought. I am cautiously a little more optimistic about 2 possible sightings of the son, but who knows. I can find no possible trace of the husband whatsoever.

                  I see she is listed as a 'seamstress' in one census. Hmmm...

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                  • #10
                    Its a pay archive Trevor....Newspaper Archives.com.

                    Sorry about misunderstanding you there,old bean.
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                    • #11
                      Malvina

                      Originally posted by Trevor Bond View Post
                      Actually How, what I meant was where are you getting the images from? Is it a pay archive, or some corner of the web I am yet to discover?

                      And yes Chris, I have spent a good 6hrs+ over the whole day today looking for ANY of this family post 1891, and it is most curious - the whole lot of them seem to disappear completely off the face of the earth. I have a few 'Malvinas' with different (presumably, if it is our lady, remarried) which I cannot at present rule out, but I think the chances are extremely slim. If it wasn't such an unusual name I probably wouldn't even entertain the thought. I am cautiously a little more optimistic about 2 possible sightings of the son, but who knows. I can find no possible trace of the husband whatsoever.

                      I see she is listed as a 'seamstress' in one census. Hmmm...

                      Hello Trevor,

                      You will find one of my relatives in that list..my Great Grandmother on my mother's fathers side. It is indeed an unusual name.

                      best wishes

                      Phil
                      from 1905...to 19.05..it was written in the stars

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                      • #12
                        Hi trevor
                        Thanks for that - it isn't just me then:-)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Phil Carter View Post
                          Hello Trevor,

                          You will find one of my relatives in that list..my Great Grandmother on my mother's fathers side. It is indeed an unusual name.

                          best wishes

                          Phil
                          Phil,

                          Assuming you know her surname, do you fancy enlightening me as to which she is - it would at least narrow it down by one!

                          Out of interest, do you know how she came by such a name? It seems to be Swiss-German, which I am assuming was the ancestry of 'our' Malvina (misspelt Malwina on one of the censuses Chris listed).

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Trevor Bond View Post
                            Phil,

                            Assuming you know her surname, do you fancy enlightening me as to which she is - it would at least narrow it down by one!

                            Out of interest, do you know how she came by such a name? It seems to be Swiss-German, which I am assuming was the ancestry of 'our' Malvina (misspelt Malwina on one of the censuses Chris listed).
                            Hello Trevor,

                            I will email you

                            best wishes

                            Phil
                            from 1905...to 19.05..it was written in the stars

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                            • #15
                              Malvina

                              Hello Trevor,

                              My apologies..this just caught my eye again.. I can regail that Malvina is not, as far as I am aware, any Swiss or German name, least not in my family. I have four examples of the name (one living) plus a deceased aunt, the lady I mentioned above and one aunt of hers. The lady mentioned above came from the West Country, Plymouth, and all of her 12 sisters..yes twelve sisters, had strange first names..exotic. I always presumed it (Malvina) to be of Scandinavian origin...According to Wikipedia..

                              Malvina is a feminine given name derived from the Gaelic mala mhinn, meaning "smooth brow". It was invented by the 18th century Scottish poet James Macpherson. The name became popular in Scandinavia on account of Napoleon, an admirer of Macpherson's Ossianic poetry, who was the godfather of several children of Jean Baptiste Jules Bernadotte, an officer of his who ruled Norway and Sweden in the early 19th century.


                              The only name that could possibly be connected with any German name previous to any Malvina in my family is a lady whose last name is Beer..but as this is also a West Country name, it seems doubtful.

                              Phil
                              from 1905...to 19.05..it was written in the stars

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