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  • #16
    There may have been a pattern of women being misused in that way, however I just think that the journalist at the Dorking Gazette was muddled on this occasion and transferred details about the awful attack on Emma Smith onto this supposed individual who was skewered like the Ratcliffe Highway killer. Some remembrance of reading about Margaret Hames's injuries in December 1887 may have fed into the mix as well.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Curryong View Post
      There may have been a pattern of women being misused in that way, however I just think that the journalist at the Dorking Gazette was muddled on this occasion and transferred details about the awful attack on Emma Smith onto this supposed individual who was skewered like the Ratcliffe Highway killer. Some remembrance of reading about Margaret Hames's injuries in December 1887 may have fed into the mix as well.
      Hi Curryong

      It has indeed been recognized, by the authors of the Complete Jack the Ripper A to Z and others, that the idea that there was an 1887 victim that was part of the skein of murders attributed to Jack the Ripper is a confusion of the Emma Smith case and that of a friend of Smith's named Margaret Hames who was attacked in 1887. Hames was assaulted and robbed in the same area in December 1887 and had spent three weeks in the infirmary; she was released two days after Boxing Day. It seems that part of the confusion occurred among the contemporary journalists who, as early as September 1888, started to mention in articles an early victim from a year earlier. It wasn't though until Terence Robertson's article in Reynolds News in 1950 that the story of the supposed victim which he called Fairy Fay became fully formed. This is a topic that I will be talking about at the upcoming UK convention in Aldgate in November. See below for Robertson's article.

      Best regards

      Chris



      Reynolds News, Sunday, October 29, 1950
      Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
      https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

      Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
      Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

      Comment


      • #18
        Hi Chris,

        You're probably aware that there was a racehorse named Fairy Fay ca. 1950.

        Searching findmypast press reports for Fairy Fay I get the following results for the 1940s:

        1941 (1)

        1945 (1)

        1947 (1)

        1948 (103)

        1949 (106)

        The surge in 48/49 is due to the racehorse. If Robertson was a sporting man, the name may well have been rattling around in his head.

        Gary

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
          Hi Chris,

          You're probably aware that there was a racehorse named Fairy Fay ca. 1950.

          Searching findmypast press reports for Fairy Fay I get the following results for the 1940s:

          1941 (1)

          1945 (1)

          1947 (1)

          1948 (103)

          1949 (106)

          The surge in 48/49 is due to the racehorse. If Robertson was a sporting man, the name may well have been rattling around in his head.

          Gary
          Hi Gary

          No actually I was not aware of the racehorse so thank you very much for bringing up that fact. Terence Robertson was involved in the fast lane of British society in the early 1950s so I am sure he was aware of the name of the racehorse.

          Best regards

          Chris
          Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
          https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

          Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
          Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

          Comment


          • #20
            Again, people are probably aware of this but I wonder how long the version of the pantomime 'Cinderella' that included the character " Fairy Faye" had been around? I could only find it listed for Boxing Day 1851 but it may have been written and produced originally in an earlier year.

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            • #21
              I've always thought that 'Fairy Faye' had a similar ring to 'Pearly Poll'.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                I've always thought that 'Fairy Faye' had a similar ring to 'Pearly Poll'.
                Yes it's one of those names, isn't it? Stewart Evans and Nick Connell expressed the thought in the first edition of The Man Who Hunted Jack the Ripper, about Inspector Reid, that the name was connected to Tottie Fay, another character of the day but who was not the victim of Jack's, of course. That seems a stretch.

                Best regards

                Chris
                Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Chris G. View Post
                  Yes it's one of those names, isn't it? Stewart Evans and Nick Connell expressed the thought in the first edition of The Man Who Hunted Jack the Ripper, about Inspector Reid, that the name was connected to Tottie Fay, another character of the day but who was not the victim of Jack's, of course. That seems a stretch.

                  Best regards

                  Chris
                  I think it's the alliteration that does it for me, although Totty would have been a good model for an unknown lady of dubious morals.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I wonder if they just muddled up Christmas and Easter, when writing about a Christmas 1887 event. Emma Smith was killed on the Easter bank holiday and Martha Tabram on the early August bank holiday.

                    My mum gave me the nickname Fairy Fay when I was a baby in the 1950s. I also share my birthday with the date of the last Whitechapel murder, that of Frances Coles.

                    Love,

                    Caz
                    X
                    I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Does anyone know anything please about a Whitechapel resident I read about ages ago? This woman was an ostensibly respectable married woman who went out late one night and was almost immediately viciously attacked by a stranger with fists and a length of wood, knocking her down. She was rescued in the middle of this attack, which I believe happened in 1888 but might have been a year earlier, and her attacker went off. She was taken to the local infirmary, where she recovered. I think her name was Mrs T Smith.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                        Hi Chris,

                        You're probably aware that there was a racehorse named Fairy Fay ca. 1950.

                        Searching findmypast press reports for Fairy Fay I get the following results for the 1940s:

                        1941 (1)

                        1945 (1)

                        1947 (1)

                        1948 (103)

                        1949 (106)

                        The surge in 48/49 is due to the racehorse. If Robertson was a sporting man, the name may well have been rattling around in his head.

                        Gary
                        Hi Gary

                        There is good reason to think that Terence Robertson did have gambling debts. I will be talking about him in my talk Saturday, November 5 at the Arbor City Hotel . The talk is a follow-up to my article in Ripperologist a decade ago. I now have a lot more information about Robertson and his life that I will be revealing to the audience at the conference a week tomorrow.

                        Best regards

                        Chris



                        Composite from the Rip article ten years ago. . .

                        Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                        https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                        Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                        Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          For what it's worth I always assumed Fairy Fay was a wholly made up name. Writers do this to cover identities, for legal reasons, if they do not know the actual name, etc.... So I always wondered IF anything was being covered up? Or was the whole story based on a rumor the writer fleshed out with a fake name? I suspect the latter. So what was the rumor? Or was it Emma Smith with confused dates? If it pertains to Emma, she had claimed to have been roughed up severely prior to the attack that caused her death.

                          Look at that name! I am not knowledgeable enough to know if Fairy Fay could have been a nickname for a woman of the streets in 1888 London, but is it even reasonable? We know a lot of nicknames and made up names; Dark Annie, Black Mary, Long Liz, Ginger, Fair Emma, etc. Another place to look for the name would be in music hall songs, etc. but I don't think this connexion has ever been made.
                          The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
                            For what it's worth I always assumed Fairy Fay was a wholly made up name. Writers do this to cover identities, for legal reasons, if they do not know the actual name, etc.... So I always wondered IF anything was being covered up? Or was the whole story based on a rumor the writer fleshed out with a fake name? I suspect the latter. So what was the rumor? Or was it Emma Smith with confused dates? If it pertains to Emma, she had claimed to have been roughed up severely prior to the attack that caused her death.

                            Look at that name! I am not knowledgeable enough to know if Fairy Fay could have been a nickname for a woman of the streets in 1888 London, but is it even reasonable? We know a lot of nicknames and made up names; Dark Annie, Black Mary, Long Liz, Ginger, Fair Emma, etc. Another place to look for the name would be in music hall songs, etc. but I don't think this connexion has ever been made.
                            Hi Anna

                            From what I now know about Terence Robertson and his writing practices, I am convinced that both the name Fairy Fay and the whole story of her murder that he told in the 29 October 1950 Reynolds News article were concocted from thin air. As I indicated earlier, the journalist may have obtained the inspiration for the name "Fairy Fay" itself from the 1940's racehorse that Gary Barnett mentioned.

                            Best regards

                            Chris
                            Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                            https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                            Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                            Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                            Comment

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