Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Malvina Haynes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Malvina Haynes

    http://www.jack-the-ripper-tour.com/...malvina-haynes
    To Join JTR Forums :
    Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

  • #2
    Some references list the street as Newnham Street, others as Newman Street, Whitechapel.

    The unfortunate Malvina appears to have lived at No. 29 Newnham Street, while our old friend Albert Bachert of Vigilance Committee infamy, (later felon and gadfly) lived at No. 13. A court appearance in Aug 1887 gives his address as Gordon House, Newnham Street, Whitechapel.

    Malvina--bashed over the head the same night as Emma Smith was done in, by person or persons unknown.

    Where, may I ask, was Mr. Toby Baskett that night?

    Personally, I'm not an adherent of the local man theory, but if I were, I'd tend to place Bachert several inches above the usual Tom, Dick, and Harrys favored by "Ripperologists."

    If such creatures "inject" themselves, Bachert was a veritable junkie of injection, outdone only by Dr. Forbes Winslow.

    Comment


    • #3
      Here's Bachert at the same address back in November 1885, getting his windows knocked out by the radical mob. He was still there in Newnham Street in 1888 when he received the 20 October post card from Jack the Ripper, who strangely referred to him as "Mr. Toby Baskett"
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        It's not easy to find out much about Bachert after he was chased out of East London, other than his arrest for fraud in early February 1893. At that time, his address is given as No. 3 Harford Street, Bristol, and his occupation is an "engraver."

        I was poking around this neighborhood and noticed that 3 months earlier, late October 1892, No. 4 Harford Street, Bristol was described as a "house of ill-repute." Not yet sure if this was next door or across the street.

        Nothing illegal about living next door to a brothel, of course, but the digs are a somewhat unusual choice for a former member of a vigilance committee, though I suppose it would be a convenient location for those who enjoy suppressing vice!
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
          It's not easy to find out much about Bachert after he was chased out of East London, other than his arrest for fraud in early February 1893. At that time, his address is given as No. 3 Harford Street, Bristol, and his occupation is an "engraver."

          I was poking around this neighborhood and noticed that 3 months earlier, late October 1892, No. 4 Harford Street, Bristol was described as a "house of ill-repute." Not yet sure if this was next door or across the street.

          Nothing illegal about living next door to a brothel, of course, but the digs are a somewhat unusual choice for a former member of a vigilance committee, though I suppose it would be a convenient location for those who enjoy suppressing vice!
          Hi R.J.

          The Skeleton Army had origination in Weston-super-Mare near Bristol. Bachert was said to have founded the Skeleton Army under the name of Alfred Charrington. [see this thread]
          http://www.jtrforums.com/showthread....ington+bachert

          I wonder if Bacherts travels to Bristol involved something to do with his prior involvement in the Skeleton Army?

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for that, Jerry. The Skeleton Army connection is certainly a strange and interesting one. I'll need to study it further.

            If you look at Newnham Street in the 1881 census (Albert Bachert is already at No. 13) it's hard not to notice how many people are listed as "printer compositors," or "bookbinders," or "master printers," or "book folders," or "printer's mechanics."

            I wonder if there was a publishing house nearby? I don't know if there is a connection, but the notation by Albert's occupation of engraver looks like "art" or "artist's," (?)which is usually how he is described in press reports, either under his own name or the alias Charrington. Maybe someone has figured out who was employing him in the 1880s?
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
              Thanks for that, Jerry. The Skeleton Army connection is certainly a strange and interesting one. I'll need to study it further.

              If you look at Newnham Street in the 1881 census (Albert Bachert is already at No. 13) it's hard not to notice how many people are listed as "printer compositors," or "bookbinders," or "master printers," or "book folders," or "printer's mechanics."

              I wonder if there was a publishing house nearby? I don't know if there is a connection, but the notation by Albert's occupation of engraver looks like "art" or "artist's," (?)which is usually how he is described in press reports, either under his own name or the alias Charrington. Maybe someone has figured out who was employing him in the 1880s?
              Hi again R.J.

              Actually someone did find out. Paul Begg in his A-Z has Bachert working for a Mr. Dix on Porridge Court, Fleet Street. After a little digging in Post office and Commercial business records, I found out it was actually Poppins Court, Fleet Street. Henry and Alfred Dix were listed as wood engravers, copper plate and printers.

              But, in my opinion, the most interesting fact is the location of Poppins Court. It was literally a stones throw from the Shoe Lane Workhouse, also a stones throw from the King Lud Pub (John Arnold's encounter)and directly across the street from the Central News Agency offices.

              I have a theory in mind, but I will save it for now. It has to do with a meet up with a certain woman at the Three Nuns Hotel on Saturday night.

              Comment


              • #8
                Kelly's Post Office Directory, 1891

                26, Poppins Court, Fleet Street (looks like 16 here, but 26 is correct)

                Comment

                Working...
                X