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  • Sarah Lewis ID

    The late Chris Scott wrote an article on a woman named Sarah Lewis whose descendants believed was the witness who gave evidence at the inquest of Mary Jane Kelly in November 1888. The article appeared in Ripperologist 133
    http://www.ripperologist.biz/pdf/ripperologist133.pdf

    I just wanted to explore other women named Sarah Lewis in this thread, particularly one I came across in the marriage regsiter of Christ Church Spitalfields who has not come up before as far as I know.

    A researcher who sometimes goes by the name San Fran mentioned the details of Charles Pateman, City Missionary, who he said had claimed to have helped over 200 couples of the lodging house class of Spitalfields, to marry.

    Looking through the marriage registers of Christ Church Spitalfields for the year 1884 to 1902, Charles Pateman's name does appear as a witness to several marriages, along with another man named James John Underwood who also had links to the City mission and a woman named Charlotte Fitzmaurice.

    One marriage that caught my eye was this one:

    Sept 17th 1888 Parish Church of Christchurch Spitalfields.

    Groom: George William Lewis, age 39, widower, occupation Hawker, address 6 George St [lodging house in Spitalfields] father's name Joseph Lewis, shoemaker.

    Bride: Sarah Ann Pike, age 33, spinster, address 6 George Street. Father' name Thomas Pike, walking stick maker.
    Both signed with an x mark.

    The witness was the Charles Pateman mentioned earlier and also Eliza Greaves who signed with an x.

    This thread is simply just deposit information and to explore this Sarah Lewis and her life and to see if anything interesting comes up as a result.

  • #2
    1871 census posted by Gary:

    6 Old Street, St Luke, Finsbury

    Thomas Pike, head, 39, walking stick maker, born London City.
    Jane Pike, wife, dressmaker born India.
    Sarah Pike, daur, 16, carpet bag maker b Bethnal Green Middlesex
    Mary Ann Pike, daur, 12, artificial flower maker b St Luke
    Jane Pike, daur, 10, scholar. b St Luke
    Eleanor Pike, 3, b St Luke.

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    • #3
      Sarah's father, Thomas Pike, was in the Whitechapel workhouse and Whitechapel Infirmary a few times between 1883 and 1885 where his address was usually Flower & Dean St. He was described as a stick dresser and admitted for an ulcerated leg on each occassion. By 1885 he was a widower.

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      • #4
        Hi Debs


        I can't find a Lewis birth with mother Pike except for 1887 in Marylebone. This might be the baby that I think Lewis had around that time, but it seems the wrong place.

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        • #5
          An Ancestry tree has George and Sarah in Vine Yard, Spitalfields in 1891 and then in Hale Street, Deptford in 1901. George's occupations are boot maker (1891) and Hawker (1901).

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          • #6
            There is a charwoman named Sarah Pike, aged 25, in a lodging house at 30, F&D in 1881. She's shown as married, though.

            (BTW, I'm running a sweepstake on how long Robert manages to resist making a 'Don't tell them your name, Pike.' quip.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
              Hi Debs


              I can't find a Lewis birth with mother Pike except for 1887 in Marylebone. This might be the baby that I think Lewis had around that time, but it seems the wrong place.
              Hi Robert,
              Thanks. I wasn't sure if this Lewis couple had children or not.
              Wasn't it the Sarah Lewis written about by Chris Scott that was pregnant at the time of the murder of MJK?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                There is a charwoman named Sarah Pike, aged 25, in a lodging house at 30, F&D in 1881. She's shown as married, though.

                (BTW, I'm running a sweepstake on how long Robert manages to resist making a 'Don't tell them your name, Pike.' quip.)
                Thanks for those Gary.
                When I was looking at the Pikes the first thing that popped in to my mind was the Pike quote that Robert loves!

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                • #9
                  Hi Debs


                  Ah, well if the baby depends on Chris's ID then that removes the baby objection.


                  Gary : you stupid boy.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                    Hi Debs


                    I can't find a Lewis birth with mother Pike except for 1887 in Marylebone. This might be the baby that I think Lewis had around that time, but it seems the wrong place.
                    That was Julia Jane, her father was a George, but her mother was Susannah Julia.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                      Hi Debs


                      Ah, well if the baby depends on Chris's ID then that removes the baby objection.


                      Gary : you stupid boy.
                      Robert, I think the Gotheimer/Lewis family story was that Sarah Lewis, their ancestor was about 5 months pregnant when she fell out with her husband and went to Miller's Court in the early hours of the day MJK was murdered. They may have been going by the 1891 census (the baby died shortly after the 1891 census)

                      Looking at the GRO birth registration index John Walter Gotheimer, mother's name Lewis, was actually registered in Sept qtr of 1888 in Mile End not Whitechapel and would have been a couple of months old at the time of the murder.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks folks. Anyone seen them in 1911? I did find Neuer, who was definitely in the wrong place at the wrong time, but no luck with the Lewises.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                          Thanks folks. Anyone seen them in 1911? I did find Neuer, who was definitely in the wrong place at the wrong time, but no luck with the Lewises.
                          No luck so far, Robert.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Howard Brown
                            Bump Up
                            Thanks for bumping this, How.
                            I think there are a couple of other interesting aspects to this, as well as the information on Sarah Lewis, married woman and Spitalfields 1888 lodging house resident:

                            San Fran's discovery of the City Missionary group that were 'encouraging' these Spitalfields lodging house residents to marry and witnessing these marriages in the church. I haven't counted the exact number but Pateman and Underwood, particularly, witnessed quite a few marriages in Christchurch Spitalfields. It's a fascinating bit of social history of the area and class of people we study in this case.

                            The other thing that is interesting is the extent to which we can rely on handed down family stories when making identifications. Chris mentions in his article that ' one of the family with whom I have been in contact told me it was family knowledge that at the time of the Miller’s Court murder
                            Sarah was 5 months pregnant.'
                            This wasn't the case as it turned out.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
                              Thanks for bumping this, How.
                              I think there are a couple of other interesting aspects to this, as well as the information on Sarah Lewis, married woman and Spitalfields 1888 lodging house resident:

                              San Fran's discovery of the City Missionary group that were 'encouraging' these Spitalfields lodging house residents to marry and witnessing these marriages in the church. I haven't counted the exact number but Pateman and Underwood, particularly, witnessed quite a few marriages in Christchurch Spitalfields. It's a fascinating bit of social history of the area and class of people we study in this case.

                              The other thing that is interesting is the extent to which we can rely on handed down family stories when making identifications. Chris mentions in his article that ' one of the family with whom I have been in contact told me it was family knowledge that at the time of the Millerís Court murder
                              Sarah was 5 months pregnant.'
                              This wasn't the case as it turned out.
                              Hi Debs,

                              I was just about to mention the second point myself. I have to say I'm surprised Chris didn't pursue John Walter's birth as it might have confirmed the '5 month's pregnant' claim and provided an 1888/9 Whitechapel address for the family.

                              It turns out it doesn't do either and my suspicion is that, despite Chris's protestations to the contrary, there has been an element of retrospective evidence gathering to support the family story.


                              Gary

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