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  • #16
    Out of curiosity, is Eagle's Russian name known?

    I'm prejudiced enough to assume that Morris Eagle is an anglisized form of another name? Perhaps something like Maurice Igel or Moishe Orel (russian for eagle) - I assume it's been looked for, but I haven't seen it mentioned.

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    • #17
      Morris Eagle the Ripper - Casebook: Jack the Ripper Forums

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      • #18
        Yes, I've read the thread, which is from 2008, so I thought I'd ask if anything newer had been uncovered.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Kattrup View Post
          Out of curiosity, is Eagle's Russian name known?

          I'm prejudiced enough to assume that Morris Eagle is an anglisized form of another name? Perhaps something like Maurice Igel or Moishe Orel (russian for eagle) - I assume it's been looked for, but I haven't seen it mentioned.
          I'm sure you're right that it was Anglicized.

          I was wondering about this guy in the 1891 Census, living at No. 5 Princes Street (off the Ratcliffe Hwy near Wellclose Square) St. George in the East. It looks like his name is Israel Eugel, or maybe Eigel, born Poland, 1863 (which would be about a year older than Morris) but couldn't find anything else about him, and obviously it may not be a relative.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Israel Eigel.JPG
Views:	73
Size:	113.7 KB
ID:	578796


          I'm not sure why Tom Wescott was confident that Morris Eagle left for the U.S. I couldn't find any evidence of him there. There was an Morris Eagle in The States in the 1890s-1900s, roughly the same age, but he was born in Virginia and was an Episcopalian clergyman.

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          • #20
            Under the heading "odds and ends still exist," apparently the Jewish Museum in London owns an invitation for the marriage between Morris Eagle and Kate Kopelansky:


            "Invitation to the wedding of Miss Kate Kopelansky and Mr Morris Eagle, 1888. This is one of the oldest invitations in the museum collection, and would have undoubtedly been made for a fairly affluent couple due to its intricate production process. Made with thin cream card and a gold finish, there is a fragile decorative paper lace border around the edge."

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            • #21
              Click image for larger version  Name:	0CFC9D70-B4D4-40A4-AE71-B758B5F341FC.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	121.2 KB ID:	578803
              Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post

              I'm sure you're right that it was Anglicized.

              I was wondering about this guy in the 1891 Census, living at No. 5 Princes Street (off the Ratcliffe Hwy near Wellclose Square) St. George in the East. It looks like his name is Israel Eugel, or maybe Eigel, born Poland, 1863 (which would be about a year older than Morris) but couldn't find anything else about him, and obviously it may not be a relative.

              Click image for larger version  Name:	Israel Eigel.JPG Views:	0 Size:	113.7 KB ID:	578796


              I'm not sure why Tom Wescott was confident that Morris Eagle left for the U.S. I couldn't find any evidence of him there. There was an Morris Eagle in The States in the 1890s-1900s, roughly the same age, but he was born in Virginia and was an Episcopalian clergyman.
              Of course, Princes Street led into Princes Square where Liz Stride’s Swedish Church was situated. My mother was born at no. 11.

              (Sorry, it’s not a very clear image. No. 5 was on the SE corner of the square. W side of the street.)

              There was a pub in Ship Alley, Wellclose Square that had various names over the years including the The Pruessischer Adler or Prussian Eagle.





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              • #22
                Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                Click image for larger version Name:	0CFC9D70-B4D4-40A4-AE71-B758B5F341FC.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	121.2 KB ID:	578803

                Of course, Princes Street led into Princes Square where Liz Stride’s Swedish Church was situated. My mother was born at no. 11.

                (Sorry, it’s not a very clear image. No. 5 was on the SE corner of the square. W side of the street.)

                There was a pub in Ship Alley, Wellclose Square that had various names over the years including the The Pruessischer Adler or Prussian Eagle.




                Ship Alley consisted almost entirely of brothels in the 1880s. The pub was run by a naturalised Dutchman named Akkersdyk, whose son was a photographer. The son emigrated to South Africa and the photographic business he started there still exists.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                  Under the heading "odds and ends still exist," apparently the Jewish Museum in London owns an invitation for the marriage between Morris Eagle and Kate Kopelansky:


                  "Invitation to the wedding of Miss Kate Kopelansky and Mr Morris Eagle, 1888. This is one of the oldest invitations in the museum collection, and would have undoubtedly been made for a fairly affluent couple due to its intricate production process. Made with thin cream card and a gold finish, there is a fragile decorative paper lace border around the edge."
                  Cool, nice find

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Kattrup View Post

                    Cool, nice find
                    Yes, a great find, RJ.

                    Looks like she died in South Africa in 1899.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                      Under the heading "odds and ends still exist," apparently the Jewish Museum in London owns an invitation for the marriage between Morris Eagle and Kate Kopelansky:


                      "Invitation to the wedding of Miss Kate Kopelansky and Mr Morris Eagle, 1888. This is one of the oldest invitations in the museum collection, and would have undoubtedly been made for a fairly affluent couple due to its intricate production process. Made with thin cream card and a gold finish, there is a fragile decorative paper lace border around the edge."
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	koplansky eagle.JPG
Views:	54
Size:	82.9 KB
ID:	579565 Courtesy of Jewish Museum.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	koplansky eagle.JPG Views:	0 Size:	82.9 KB ID:	579565 Courtesy of Jewish Museum.
                        Nice find, Debs/RJ! For me, photos and ephemera like this help bring the often two-dimensional ‘cast of thousands’ to
                        life.

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