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In a Den of Infamy

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  • In a Den of Infamy

    Here's an account of a doctor dragging a lady into a dark alley by the wrist at 2 o'clock in the morning after he was supposedly robbed. Cornwall street appears to be basically at Cable and Cannon Streets running east and west. Anyone know where No. 10 Station-Place is located?

    Also, the only reference I can find to the Liverpool House, Balaam Street in Plaistow, is a Doctor Raheem Buksh from Calcutta. There are references to the Obstetrics Society at this location which is interesting in terms of the Ripper victims. Mary Ann Regan was a prostitute and another very violent woman. She was also a known thief along with sidekick Driscoll.

    The good doctor sure seems to be out late at night.


  • #2
    You may find this interesting, Jerry.

    http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=1463

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
      You may find this interesting, Jerry.

      http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=1463
      Thanks Gary!

      That certainly clears up where Station Place is. Thanks a lot for that.

      The Doctor in this thread was described as a man of colour. Emily Smith describes her suspect as having a pale face. Some witness accounts have Jack the Ripper as a dark skinned foreigner. Sounds like the same part of town though Gary.

      Also as a side note, I found a report in February 1888 of a Mary Ann Regan assaulting lodging house keeper John Satchell.

      Thanks again!

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      • #4
        Hi Jerry,

        Looking through a 1914 directory of the Commercial Road I came across the following entry for no. 284: Rahim Bakhshi Isaac, physician and surgeon.

        The Isaac bit seems at odds with the rest, unless it was the names of two doctors in practice at the same address.

        No. 284 was between Watney Street and Dean Street, very near Station Place.

        On the 1901 census there is a Raheem Buksh, a 23-year-old merchant from India at the Strangers Home for Asiatics, Africans and South Sea Islanders in the West India Dock Road.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
          Hi Jerry,

          Looking through a 1914 directory of the Commercial Road I came across the following entry for no. 284: Rahim Bakhshi Isaac, physician and surgeon.

          The Isaac bit seems at odds with the rest, unless it was the names of two doctors in practice at the same address.

          No. 284 was between Watney Street and Dean Street, very near Station Place.

          On the 1901 census there is a Raheem Buksh, a 23-year-old merchant from India at the Strangers Home for Asiatics, Africans and South Sea Islanders in the West India Dock Road.
          Gary,

          That's interesting.

          Dr. Raheem Buksh passed away at The Hall, Balaam Street, Plaistow on November 15th, 1908.

          Thanks for the follow up.

          Have you been able to find any additional references to Dr. Ravsangle? I have not.

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          • #6
            Hi Jerry,

            Nothing at all on Ravisangle. But Buksh obviously new Thomas Openshaw:

            Click image for larger version

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            Gary

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
              Hi Jerry,

              Nothing at all on Ravisangle. But Buksh obviously new Thomas Openshaw:

              [ATTACH]15589[/ATTACH]


              Gary
              Gary,

              Yes, it appears Thomas Openshaw was an old friend of his. Here is the transcribed obituary for Buksh.

              RAHEEM MAHOMED BUKSH, M.R.C.S., L.S.A.
              THERE passed away at The Hall, Balaam Street, Plaistow,onSunday,November 15th, a medical man who has always been a persona grata at the London Hospital-RaheemMahomed Buksh. At the time of his death he was Honorary Surgeon to the Plaistow Dispensary, and had previously been House-Surgeon and House-Physician at the London Hospital, and also House-Surgeon to the Poplar Hospital. After leaving Poplar he settled at Plaistow, where he in course of time succeeded in obtaining an extensive practice. His first wife had been a nurse at the London Hospital, and it is said that her kindness to the very poor and their grateful appreciation of her efforts afforded her husband a pleasure that only those who knew his excellent personal qualities can well understand. For a long time he had been in bad health, but few even amongst his most intimate friends were aware of it. Most fortunately, he suffered little, if at all, and his last days were cheered by the kindly attention of Dr. Hadley and his old and highly-esteemed friend, Mr. Thomas Openshaw. The interment took place at Brooklands on Friday, November 20th, in the Mohammedan section. The funeral was attended by a number of his fellow-students and patients, and he was reverently laid to rest by his fellowcountrymen residing in London.

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