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Castle Alley-A new perspective

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  • Castle Alley-A new perspective

    First off, the photographs in this post were taken from Casebook posts from Rob Clack, so I want to thank him for finding these over the years. The photo with the "x" is one I had never seen until today.

    There has been much discussion over the years of all the intricate alleys and byways in Castle Alley and thus providing many options for the killer to escape. I wanted to address that idea in this post by getting into the detail of Castle Alley with the aid of Rob's photographs.

    First off, the area we know as Castle Alley (where McKenzie's body was found), is the lower or southern half of another street named Old Castle Street. The break point where the two streets merged was the Three Crowns Public House. Castle alley itself was about 170 yards long from Whitechapel High Street to the Three Crowns to the north. The entrance at Whitechapel High Street was about 3 feet wide. Unless one knew what was behind the 3 foot entrance they would have never known the alley even existed. On the night of Alice McKenzie's murder there was a fixed point officer near this entrance.


    Castle Alley From Whitechapel High Street.
    From The Penny Illustrated Paper. July 27th 1889.
    Copyright, The British Library Board.


    At the other end of the Alley was the Three Crowns Public House. The Three Crowns was about the halfway point of the entirety of the street which ran from Whitechapel High Street, to the south, and Wentworth Street, to the north. Walking from the High Street entrance, heading north, once you reached the Three Crowns the street changed names to Old Castle Street which continued up to Wentworth.

    This is a view of the Three Crowns looking from the north (Old Castle Street) toward the south into the alley. The small pole on the right is about where Andrews and Badham met (see same pole on last picture in this post). Here is Andrews inquest testimony on the subject: Police-constable Walter Andrews, 272 H, said, - About ten minutes to 1 this morning I saw Sergeant Badlam at the corner of Old Castle-street, leading into Castle-alley. That was on the opposite corner of the publichouse. The sergeant said, "All right," and I said the same. I then proceeded up Castle-alley, and tried the doors on the west side of the alley. While doing so I noticed a woman lying on the pavement. Her head was lying eastward, and was on the edge of the kerbstone, with her feet towards the building, which was a wheelwright's shop and warehouse.

    The building on the immediate right with the doorway is the Board School. Further down on the right you can see three buildings in the near distance. One smaller sandwiched in between a lighter building and one with a chimney. The lighter building is the back of the wash houses and about where the sandwiched building meets the chimney building is where Alice was murdered.(see Ed Stow's map below; the bottom of the blue line is the murder spot)





    This sketch shows the sandwiched building and the chimney building.



    This last picture is the one I had not seen before. The "x" is actually pretty close to the spot PC Walter Andrews and Sergeant Badham met at about 12:48/50. In the Three Crowns picture above, the view is reversed. This view is from Castle Alley looking north into old Castle Street with the Three Crowns on the right. You can see the 4 stack chimney on top which matches the other picture. You can also faintly see the Three Crowns sign hanging from above. The Board School is on the left. You can also just get a glimpse on the far right of the hoarding seen in the other picture.



    To sum this all up and get to my point, go back and look at the Three Crowns picture looking toward the murder scene and compare that to the goad map of Ed Stow's. You can see that it was not very far at all from where Andrews met Badham and where Alice was being murdered under a lamp. If the killer was disturbed by the two policemen he would surely have been seen or heard I would think. After all, Andrews heard the footsteps of Isaac Lewis Jacobs standing at the body of Alice almost all the way to Wentworth Street.

  • #2
    Great idea for a topic! We know very little about Castle Alley.
    The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
      Great idea for a topic! We know very little about Castle Alley.
      Thanks Anna,

      You mentioned escape routes in Castle Alley the other day. I feel that the fact Andrews and Badham basically cut off all routes to the north and even the small exit by the Three Crowns which led to Newcastle Street, that left only a few options for the killer. The 3 foot wide entrance at Whitechapel High Street or ducking into a house. The fixed officer never mentioned seeing anybody leave that exit and by the time Andrews blew his whistle, the place was swarming with cops and cordoned off at each end. The killer would have been trapped within the confines of the maze.

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      • #4
        Great stuff, Jerry!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
          Thanks Anna,

          You mentioned escape routes in Castle Alley the other day. I feel that the fact Andrews and Badham basically cut off all routes to the north and even the small exit by the Three Crowns which led to Newcastle Street, that left only a few options for the killer. The 3 foot wide entrance at Whitechapel High Street or ducking into a house. The fixed officer never mentioned seeing anybody leave that exit and by the time Andrews blew his whistle, the place was swarming with cops and cordoned off at each end. The killer would have been trapped within the confines of the maze.
          Fascinating! I think the killer(s) in all the murders were capable of escaping through or into houses.
          The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
            Fascinating! I think the killer(s) in all the murders were capable of escaping through or into houses.
            Personally I have my sights on three possibilities.

            1) Alice was murdered on the doorstep of David King and Sons. I have a thread already on this, but Franklin King, his son and partner, could have easily stepped into his shop after the murder. After all, his former residence was accessed by the gate where Catherine Eddowes was murdered.

            2) Walter Andrews. Slay me if you like, but the evidence doesn't leave much room.

            3) Isaac Lewis Jacobs. Fetching pickles and cheese for his brother at 12:50 a.m.? And throwing the name of John McCarthy around? Was he really headed to Dorset Street for a meal, or was he giving Big John an alibi? Why even mention that he was specifically headed to McCarthy's? Why not just say he was headed around the corner for a snack? Or, did he just finish cleaning up the blood on his hands at his nearby residence in Newcastle Street and was using McCarthy's as an excuse to be out and about?

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            • #7
              Good work, JD.
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              • #8
                Thank you Gary and Howard.

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                • #9
                  I'll second/third/fourth/fifth the appreciation of your work here, Jerry. Truly interesting stuff.
                  Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                  "Suche Nullen"
                  (F. Nietzsche)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                    I'll second/third/fourth/fifth the appreciation of your work here, Jerry. Truly interesting stuff.
                    Thank you, Sam!

                    I posted this clip in one of the McKenzie threads I started but it really interests me in this particular discussion. Think about where the pictures above show the spot Andrews and Badham met. From the looks of it, they had a direct view to the murder site and from not a very far distance. A gas lamp was burning over the murder scene. Now read the last line of this clip and I might ask what it suggests to each of you? By the way, in my opinion the witness statements at both the inquest and to the news reporters seem to back this statement up.


                    Lloyds Weekly Newspaper
                    Sunday, July 21, 1889, London, Middlesex


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                    • #11
                      One more quick observation.

                      PC Andrews:

                      Lloyds Weekly Newspaper July 21, 1889

                      Had you been in the alley before? Yes, between 20 and 25 past twelve. This is before I found the body. As police-constable Allen came out I went in and was there between two and three minutes. Nobody was there then. After leaving the alley I went half way to Goulston-street, and then down the other side, returning into Old Castle-street and through into Castle-alley. At 25 past 12 I passed from the alley into New Castle-street, up one side of the High-street, Whitechapel, and into Goulston-street, returning into Whitechapel High-street. Then I went into Middlesex-street, into Wentworth-street again, when I saw Sergeant Badham, as I stated at the commencement of my evidence. This would have taken 27 minutes.

                      Sergeant Badham:

                      The Times, Thursday, July 18th, 1889

                      [Coroner] Had you been in the alley at all that night? - No.

                      So, when PC Andrews meets Badham opposite the Three Crowns, he is approaching from Wentworth Street heading toward the alley and the Three Crowns. Sergeant Badham had not been in the alley at all that night. That means that Badham also must have approached the Three Crowns from the northerly direction, walking down Old Castle Street from Wentworth. Since neither man states he saw the other anywhere in Old Castle Street, this must mean one arrived at the Three Crowns before the other. They each claim to have met each other at 12:48 or 12:50. So who arrived first and how much earlier than 12:48 did that policeman arrive?

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                      • #12
                        Interesting thread Jerry

                        An excerpt from my book which may be of interest.

                        Monty



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                        • #13
                          Whoa!

                          That's obviously the large print version for the elderly. My apologies.

                          How, can you please rectify as you deem fit. Many thanks and sorry for mucking you about.

                          Cheers

                          Monty

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Monty View Post
                            That's obviously the large print version for the elderly.
                            Don't apologise. I found it very valuable! This isn't the place, Neil, but the enlarged text made me wonder if there was any chance that Amberley will give us a Kindle version of your book - which, incidentally, is a book anyone interested in this subject should have on their bookshelf. But my virtual bookshelf wants one too.

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                            • #15
                              Neil:

                              No problem...thank you for the scan.
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