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Dublin Police In Whitechapel Early October 1888

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  • Dublin Police In Whitechapel Early October 1888

    Irish Times
    October 9, 1888
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  • #2
    thanks

    Hello Howard. Thanks for posting this.


    Interesting.


    Cheers.
    LC

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    • #3
      Irish Times
      October 11, 1888
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      • #4
        I like reading these old newspaper clippings from Ireland that were printed during the Whitechapel murders. A good book on this matter was Alan Sharp's London Correspondence: Jack the Ripper and the Irish Press.

        Alan entitled Chapter 5, "The Irish Question" and it contained examples of how the Irish journalists used the Ripper murders as cannon fodder for their Nationalist opinions.

        In Chapter 4, there were a couple of news reports that caught my interest. One came from the Sept 11, 1888 Dublin Evening Mail. Here is an excerpt from it:

        Upward of a hundred detectives from Scotland Yard have been engaged in scouring the neighbourhood of Whitechapel with a view to obtain clues. They are strictly ordered to keep any information they may obtain a close secret.

        The Belfast News-Letter followed up on that theme a few days later. I will share an excerpt of that report on my next post.

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        • #5
          The Thursday Sept 13, 1888 issue of the Belfast News-Letter complained about the uninformative attitude of the police during the murders.

          At the present moment the police are just where they were when the (Chapman) murder of Saturday morning was reported to them. If they have got any clue at all, which I very much doubt, they keep it a secret from the public. Over and again law-breakers and criminals have been run down through certain simple facts being made known. Dr. Lamson, the poisoner, was brought to just in consequence of a paragraph which got into the newspapers. The chemist who supplied him with the aconite, the poison with which he did for his afflicted brother-in-law, on seeing an account of the murder in the papers tendered his evidence at once at Scotland Yard, and Lamson, who was on the Continent, came back to London and offered to explain that his connection with the crime was perfectly innocent. Yet, will it be believed that the police officer who gave the information to the Press was severely reprimanded for doing so?

          Alan put in a footnote about Lamson the poisoner: On December 3rd, 1881, Bournemouth doctor George Henry Lamson murdered his disabled brother-in-law before he reached his majority so that his share of a large inheritance would pass to Lamson's wife. The murder was achieved with a poisoned slice of Dundee cake.

          I never tried a piece of Dundee cake before, but I think I will pass on it the next time it gets served !!

          But as we see here, the Irish press put up an argument against a police policy that kept newsmen in the dark about new information regarding the Whitechapel murders.

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          • #6
            But as we see here, the Irish press put up an argument against a police policy that kept newsmen in the dark about new information regarding the Whitechapel murders.

            As we know, Joltin' Joe, there are cops who wouldn't think twice about taking some money from an inquisitive reporter...not just in London either.

            In an unsolved murder skein which the Met Police had to have envisioned continuing by the time of the Chapman murder (At least Tabram, Nichols, and Chapman in that skein), it was in their best interest to hold things from the public...which the newspaper people knew but just made a big deal of just to show their readership that they were doing their job.

            We both know what happens when sensitive undisclosed info does especially when someone in a position of authority blabs it out. Think that complete ass Diane Feinstein, former Mayor of San Francisco, during the Night Stalker murder series in the mid 1980's:

            Ramirez, who had been following the media coverage of his crimes, left Los Angeles and headed to San Francisco.On August 18, 1985, he entered the home of Peter and Barbara Pan. He shot the sleeping Peter, age 66, in the temple with a .25 caliber handgun. He then beat and sexually assaulted Barbara, age 62, before shooting her in the head and leaving her for dead. At the crime scene, Ramirez used lipstick to scrawl a pentagram and the phrase "Jack the Knife" on the bedroom wall. When it was discovered that the ballistics and shoe print evidence from the Los Angeles crime scenes matched the Pan crime scene, San Francisco's then-mayor Dianne Feinstein divulged the information in a televised press conference. This leak infuriated the detectives in the case, as they knew the killer would be following media coverage, which gave him opportunity to destroy crucial forensic evidence. Ramirez, who had indeed been watching the press, dropped his size 11 1/2 Avia sneakers over the side of the Golden Gate Bridge that night.[ He remained in the area for a few more days before heading back to the Los Angeles area

            The cops lost their shit when the dunce Feinstein blew the only clue they had.
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            • #7
              I prefer voting for Emperor Norton as mayor of San Francisco.

              It's also expected that the police would keep secret some critical pieces of information discovered at a crime scene that only the crook would know. That way if somebody confesses to the crime, the police would realize that the person is legitimate if the hidden piece of information is revealed by the confessor.

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              • #8
                Here are a couple of examples of how the Irish press used the Whitechapel crimes to further their political and social goals. In early October 1888, the Freeman's Journal printed the following. The newspaper spoke of the six murders from Emma Smith to Catherine Eddowes.

                If six such murders as these occurred in any part of Ireland the district would have been promptly saddled with a crushing blood tax. It would have been proved to demonstration by Tory speakers that the reason of the non-discovery of the murderer was the sympathy of the people with crime. Nobody however makes that suggestion in the case of Whitechapel.

                The Belfast Morning News chimed in with a similar point:

                We need not point out how the Unionist Press would shriek if such a state of things prevailed in Ireland, and would denounce the lawlessness of the Irish and their sympathy with crime, because no clue to the criminals could be found. We should be sorry to imitate the Unionist tactics, and accuse the people of London of complicity with these frightful deeds; but it is impossible to hide away the horrible fact that London or at least parts of it, are cesspools of immorality -- that there in a week more crime is committed than takes place in Ireland in a year.

                Alan's book provided a number of examples of this type of writing.

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                • #9
                  Right as rain, Joe....Alan's book is a definite contribution to the field.

                  Your post is, as we both know, just one of the many articles the Irish press walloped England with.

                  Thanks for posting....
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