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Swanson's Marginalia: Our Perceptions

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    There's no particuar reason, Chris, just that he did write it wice, which could suggest that he felt it was important and might have been something he witnessed. That's all. The idea that the endpaper notations were written years later after the earlier marginal notes is, as yet, unexplained. I don't know how Dr Davis reached that conclusion other than by the handwriting having deteoriorated, suggesting that some time had passed.
    The marginalia, written in ink, has deteriorated dramatically, and faded to the extent that it is now hard to make out, as we showed in Ripperologist 100. By contrast, today, apparently, the endpaper notation, written in pencil, looks clearer, to my eye, than the marginalia. I am going by the photographs we ran, and naturally SPE makes a good point that one should really judge by seeing the documents in person, and I admit that disadvantage.

    Chris
    Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
    https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

    Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
    Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

    Comment


    • #32
      Back on the old Casebook site, before it collapsed, I seem to remember posting details from another book that Swanson had scribbled notes into, but it doesn't really matter if it was or wasn't, for the point I make remains largely unaffected by that.
      What I noticed then was that as well as writing in the margins, Swanson - if it were him - had quickly gone through large bodies of text by running a pencil down through the margins, as if he wanted to go back to the text at a later date and comment on it.
      Is there any evidence of that in the volume you chaps discuss here?
      Robert still might have the images I hope.

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      • #33
        Hello AP

        The mind plays tricks but I seem to remember the note taker/marginalia writer was Littlechild and not Swanson who was discussed on the old Casebook boards before the Great Crash.

        Chris
        Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
        https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

        Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
        Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

        Comment


        • #34
          Do you mean to tell me, Chris, that I discovered Littlechild marginalia back then?
          Just pass me the buns, I want to fight.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by A.P. Wolf View Post
            Do you mean to tell me, Chris, that I discovered Littlechild marginalia back then?
            Just pass me the buns, I want to fight.
            Hello AP

            I will only fight using cream buns. Twenty paces at dawn?

            Chris
            Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
            https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

            Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
            Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

            Comment


            • #36
              Is this Bunfight at OK Corral?

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                Is this Bunfight at OK Corral?
                ...looks more like Ernie vs Two-Ton Ted from Teddington, from where I'm sitting

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                • #38
                  I want to set a few rules for this bun fight first.
                  1. You can throw buns at Swanson, Anderson and Smith, but it is forbidden to throw buns at Littlechild.
                  2. You cannot throw buns at Littlechild but feel free to throw them at anyone else.
                  3. If you see Tom he is a legitimate target.
                  4. If you see Dan, you are lucky.
                  5. If you suffer from disylexia or autism, buns are round, so do not throw the bread which is square... we need it for toasting.
                  6. No writing in the margins with pencil, please use a biro.
                  Dated: 17th September 1888.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by A.P. Wolf View Post
                    Dated: 17th September 1888.
                    That's a very interesting date to choose, AP. I wonder why?

                    Chris
                    Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                    https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                    Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                    Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Chris G. View Post
                      The marginalia, written in ink, has deteriorated dramatically, and faded to the extent that it is now hard to make out, as we showed in Ripperologist 100. By contrast, today, apparently, the endpaper notation, written in pencil, looks clearer, to my eye, than the marginalia. I am going by the photographs we ran, and naturally SPE makes a good point that one should really judge by seeing the documents in person, and I admit that disadvantage.

                      Chris
                      Doesn't some ink fade with time, whereas pencil, if not rubbed, retains its fresh appearance?

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Paul View Post
                        Doesn't some ink fade with time, whereas pencil, if not rubbed, retains its fresh appearance?
                        I think you're right, Paul. The constituents of the ink would make it prone to oxidation and other chemical reactions with the air that would cause its appearance to deteriorate over time. The graphite in a pencil, in contrast, wouldn't be as susceptible to such phenomena.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                          I think you're right, Paul. The constituents of the ink would make it prone to oxidation and other chemical reactions with the air that would cause its appearance to deteriorate over time. The graphite in a pencil, in contrast, wouldn't be as susceptible to such phenomena.
                          Which proves that my old schoolmasters were correct when they used to tell me, "George, get the lead out!"

                          Chris
                          Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                          https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                          Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                          Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Chris G. View Post
                            Which proves that my old schoolmasters were correct when they used to tell me, "George, get the lead out!"

                            Chris
                            Yes, well you can go and stand in the corner with the pointy hat on for that one, and I'll refrain from making comments about the lead in your pencil.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                              I think you're right, Paul. The constituents of the ink would make it prone to oxidation and other chemical reactions with the air that would cause its appearance to deteriorate over time. The graphite in a pencil, in contrast, wouldn't be as susceptible to such phenomena.
                              Hello boyo. Fel ach? Fi cannot areithia Cymraeg o'r gorau , namyn hon ewyllysia 'n obeithiol bod da ddigon at chymysga hychydig boblogi. 'm ymysg 'u!

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                              • #45
                                Which means, I am out of the office at the moment. I will respond upon my return.

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