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The Littlechild Letter....

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  • Hi All,

    Go here—

    http://www.civilwarhome.com/civilwarmedicine.htm

    Regards,

    Simon

    Comment


    • I think Nats was recalling the time when Tumblety hung around the Irish 69th Regiment during the Civil War. The 'doctor' tried to pass himself off as a surgeon on General McClellan's staff during those days. The Irish 69th Regiment was commanded by Colonel Michael Corcoran.

      Corcoran was one of the founding fathers of the Fenian Brotherhood in New York, so Tumblety was met with no resistance. He rode right up to the soldiers and mingled with them. I could see why Nats might not have remembered the exact details of this. After all, the story was published almost 3 years ago!

      http://www.casebook.org/ripper_media/book_reviews/periodicals/whitechapel_society.2006-04.html

      The Irish-American soldiers at Fort Corcoran went down the road and built an installation called Fort Haggerty. Tumblety ended up selling phony military discharge papers to at least two soldiers at Fort Haggerty.

      Comment


      • Hi All,

        Doctor Francis Tumblety was arrested in London on 7th November 1888, appeared before the beak on 16th November 1888, was bailed in the sum of £300, skipped bail and, evading possibly the world's most sophisticated secret police/surveillance organization, escaped to France where, using the name Frank Townsend, he boarded the transatlantic liner La Bretagne and arrived in New York on 3rd December 1888.

        Although not a single word had been written about Tumblety's arrest in the British press, he arrived in New York to a fanfare of publicity. US newspapers trumpeted his arrest in London on suspicion of committing the Whitechapel Murders, but made no mention of the fact that these charges had been dropped and he had been arraigned on charges of gross indecency.

        Various newspaper reports tell us that that Inspector Walter Andrews of Scotland Yard, who on 29th November 1888 set out to escort Roland Gideon Israel Barnet on extradition charges to Toronto, arriving in Canada 11th December 1888, subsequently travelled to New York in an effort to locate Tumblety.

        For instance—

        Thanet Advertiser, 5th January 1889—

        "According to a New York correspondent, Inspector Andrews, said to be of Scotland Yard, has arrived in New York from Montreal. It is generally believed, so the correspondent says, that the inspector has received orders from England to commence his search in that city for the Whitechapel murderer."

        This report makes absolutely no sense. Charges of Tumblety being the Whitechapel Murderer had been dropped in London and, as Stewart Evans points out in a dissertation on Casebook, he could not be touched by the English police [on charges of gross indecency] while in the USA – and he knew it."

        Andrews [if he actually did travel from Canada to the USA] was wasting his time.

        Also in the US in December 1888 was Chief Superintendent John Shore. Inspector Jarvis, too, involved in an errand to secure evidence for The Times newspaper to be used at the Special Commission. And tucked up, coincidentally on the generous payroll of The Times at New York's Gilsey House Hotel, were James and Martha Thomson, in search of General F.F. Millen.

        Five top Scotland Yard cops [and its unofficial agents] were in and around New York and not taking the blindest bit of notice of Tumblety—the world's first serial killer hiding in plain sight.

        In berating the British police for suspecting him of being "Jack the Ripper", Tumblety told the New York World, Tuesday 29th January 1889 just how respectable he was—

        “I am a frequenter of some of the best London clubs, among others the Carleton [Carlton] Club and the Beefsteak Club."

        If true, Tumblety was in exalted company.

        Also a member of the Carlton and Beefsteak clubs was—

        The Rt. Hon Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley, Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department, who met with Doctor George Bagster Phillips at the House of Commons on the evening of November 9th 1888.

        Consider club membership in the light of Tumblety being allowed to flee the UK, summed up by this newspaper report—

        Marlborough Express [New Zealand], 12th November 1888—

        A LONDON CLUB SCANDAL—THE AFFAIR SUPPRESSED

        London, November 9th 1888

        "A horrible scandal with a private West End club is reported. Ninety eight members in all are implicated. Thirty one warrants have been issued, but will not be executed on the understanding that the persons connected with it leave the United Kingdom. The list of offenders includes future dukes, the sons of dukes, peers, Hebrew financiers, many honorable persons, and several officers of the Imperial Army. All the matter have suddenly resigned their commissions. The offenders have fled. The newspapers have suppressed reference to the scandal, but there is no doubt of its having taken place."

        Could Tumblety have been playing "hide the sausage" with the right people?

        Smoke and mirrors.

        Regards,

        Simon

        Comment


        • Dear Simon:

          Thanks very,very much for this post.

          Hopefully,when Mr. Evans gets around to it, he can comment on the content.

          Hope all is well...

          HB
          To Join JTR Forums :
          Contact [email protected]

          Comment


          • Hi Howard,

            I look forward to it.

            Regards,

            Simon

            Comment


            • Hi Howard,

              A point of interest—

              Henry Labouchere MP—against whom Chief Inspector Frederick Jarvis filed a personal libel action in 1889 for suggesting his nefarious involvement in connection with Scotland Yard and The Times newspaper getting the goods on Parnell for the Special Commission—was voted out of the Beefsteak Club 77 to 38 [Labouchere himself abstained] in November 1879.

              I wonder how Francis Tumblety voted.

              Regards,

              Simon

              Comment


              • Hi Simon

                Your newspaper report on the scandal reminds me very much of one that Chris Scott posted some time ago. In the end, Chris decided that the year of the report was 1889 and not 1888. Is there some smudging, faintness or other unclearness in your source?

                Comment


                • Hi Robert,

                  No smudging, I assure you. What would be the point? It's the sharp boy who gets by you guys.

                  Since you raise the question, what evidence other than Chris Scott [whom I happen to admire and respect] is there to assume that the club scandal happened later than 1888?

                  Regards,

                  Simon

                  Comment


                  • Hi Simon

                    It's just that it reminded me so much of Chris's article. As I said, he found the year was 1889. Either he misread the date or there was something wrong with the source, so I wondered if the same thing had happened to you.

                    Comment


                    • Hi Guys,

                      November must be a bad month for scandals. The following was published in the Philadelphia Inquirer on November 11, 1889

                      Best

                      Tim

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Tim Riordan View Post
                        Hi Guys,

                        November must be a bad month for scandals. The following was published in the Philadelphia Inquirer on November 11, 1889

                        Best

                        Tim
                        Hi Tim

                        Of course you realise that the news article you posted relates to the Cleveland Street scandal.

                        Chris
                        Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                        https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                        Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                        Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                        Comment


                        • Hi Robert,

                          You were quite right about the date of the article. Well spotted. It's from the Marlborough Express, 12th November 1889 but wrongly dated on Casebook as 1888.

                          Here's the article itself—



                          Regards,

                          Simon

                          Comment


                          • Hi Chris,

                            Yes, I realized that the article was on the Cleveland Street affiar. Are the other articles referring to another scandal? It was in November that Parke's allegations were making waves. If there was another scandal, then November 1889 was a bad month

                            Best,

                            Tim

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Tim Riordan View Post
                              Hi Chris,

                              Yes, I realized that the article was on the Cleveland Street affiar. Are the other articles referring to another scandal? It was in November that Parke's allegations were making waves. If there was another scandal, then November 1889 was a bad month

                              Best,

                              Tim
                              I think it's all part of the same thing, Tim.

                              Chris
                              Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                              https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                              Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                              Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                              Comment


                              • Back to Post #115

                                (Actually it has become Post #123 now!)

                                A tidbit could be added to the first paragraph of that post. After Tumblety's Nov 7th arrest in London it should also be said that he was released on police bail within 24 hours and that a subsequent arrest warrant was issued for him on Nov 14th.

                                Some reports said the La Bretagne arrived in Castle Garden on Monday Dec 3, 1888 as Simon mentioned. But there are other reports that said it arrived on Sunday Dec 2nd. The New York World had a news reporter who eyewitnessed the arrival of the French vessel, and a few days later he blared out the headlines that the ship arrived on Sunday. He even reported that it docked at 1:30pm.

                                Comment

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