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  • If the previous numbering started at the SW corner and ran consecutively along the South side W-E and then returned E-W along the North side, what is now no. 16 might well have been 26.

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    • Hi Gary,

      It's certainly a thought, but a fly in the ointment might be the fact that a section of Rosehill Road used to be Rosehill Terrace.

      " . . . that the name Rosehill-terrace, and any other name or names now in use in Rosehill-road, and the existing numbers be abolished . . ."

      Simon

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
        Hi Gary,

        It's certainly a thought, but a fly in the ointment might be the fact that a section of Rosehill Road used to be Rosehill Terrace.

        " . . . that the name Rosehill-terrace, and any other name or names now in use in Rosehill-road, and the existing numbers be abolished . . ."

        Simon
        Perhaps the terrace was comprised of what later became 30-46...

        Comment


        • Rosehill Road was obviously developed piecemeal. The 1881 census lists only 15 houses in occupation and there’s no sign of Rosehill Terrace, which was almost certainly the terrace numbered 30/2-46 which still exists today.


          1881 Census (covering both sides of RHR):

          Eglantine Rd (N of RHR)

          2 RHR
          4 RHR
          Irvine Villa
          6 RHR
          12 RHR
          Thurnell Villa
          Rodney House
          Llanther
          1 Norwood Villas
          2 Norwood Villas
          Chilton
          Framfield
          Auburn Villa
          26
          24

          Aspley Rd (W of RHR)

          The pre-1887 numbering is a bit confusing, but for our purposes we find several references to Francis Cowdry at ‘Ingleside’, but none to Samuel at that house. And in addition, the 1888 Kelly’s identifies no. 18 as ‘Ingleside’, with Francis in residence there and Samuel in residence at no. 16, where he can also be found on the 1891 census,

          I should add that as far as I’m aware, there are no contemporary sources linking Nichols specifically to Samuel and Sarah Cowdry - only to a couple named Cowdry at ‘Ingleside’.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

            The pre-1887 numbering is a bit confusing, but for our purposes we find several references to Francis Cowdry at ‘Ingleside’, but none to Samuel at that house. And in addition, the 1888 Kelly’s identifies no. 18 as ‘Ingleside’, with Francis in residence there and Samuel in residence at no. 16, where he can also be found on the 1891 census,

            I should add that as far as I’m aware, there are no contemporary sources linking Nichols specifically to Samuel and Sarah Cowdry - only to a couple named Cowdry at ‘Ingleside’.
            Thanks for clarifying this specific point, Gary. I was just about to mention this and ask whether or not it alters the fact that it was Francis and Martha Cowdry who lived at 'Ingleside' at No.18 (as per the Kelly's ref. you found)in 1888.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
              Thanks for clarifying this specific point, Gary. I was just about to mention this and ask whether or not it alters the fact that it was Francis and Martha Cowdry who lived at 'Ingleside' at No.18 (as per the Kelly's ref. you found)in 1888.
              No, it doesn’t, Debs. It just means we can’t be sure what number ‘Ingleside’ was prior to the 1887 renumbering. The 1888 Kelly’s makes it pretty clear who was living at Ingleside when Polly was there:

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              In addition, we have the 1887 Clarke’s Blood Mixture letter from an F. A. Cowdry of Ingleside, several ERs showing Frank at Ingleside (but not giving the number) and the 1887 notification of Mrs Francis Cowdry of Ingleside being appointed a school inspector/governor (can’t remember which, but it’s on here somewhere).

              As for Samuel and Sarah, the only sources I can find of their being resident at Ingleside are modern ripper books. I suspect that the fact that by 1891 Frank and Martha had left Rosehill Road leaving Samuel and Sarah as the only Cowdries in the street may be the explanation for that.*

              One other small suggestive element is that Martha had connections to Southwark and Lambeth whereas Sarah came from the East End, so Martha is more likely to have had connections to the Lambeth Guardians.

              *I should add that Samuel and Sarah were also the only Cowdries in RHR on the 1881 census. Frank and Martha were elsewhere (Clapham?). That said, Martha was living at 1, RHR when she married Frank in 1877, so her connection to the street may have predated the Cowdries’.

              Comment


              • Thanks, Gary!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
                  Thanks, Gary!
                  You’re welcome, Debs.

                  I think the earliest reference to Frank being at Ingleside is 1885, and I believe you found ER’s to that effect from the early 1890s.

                  As to when he started his wanderings, and when the rift occurred between him and Martha (if indeed there was one) we can’t be totally sure, but it was probably no later than the early 90s.

                  Of course, that may have had nothing at all to do with Polly, but inviting an alcoholic ex-prostitute (possibly) into the family home you share with your much younger husband carries an element of risk, I’d have thought, and it seems the couple spent most (if not all) of their post-Polly married life apart. If it was our FC who applied for a passport in April, 1890, then that period was some kind of a watershed in both his career and his personal life.

                  Comment


                  • This is 32-46 RHR today:

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                    It’s clearly a late 19thC purpose-built terrace, and there’s nothing else that seems an obvious candidate for RH Terrace.

                    One slightly odd feature is that it consists of only 8 houses as opposed to the original 9 on Simon’s map. The one at the eastern end may have been destroyed by bombing, but the houses at either end have matching gables. Maybe the gable to no. 32 was constructed after no. 30 was demolished to maintain the symmetry of the terrace?

                    Incidentally, these houses now sell for upwards of £2,000,000!

                    Comment


                    • RH Terrace

                      Looks like there’s a chimney missing at the eastern end, suggesting there may indeed have been a reconfiguration of the roof of no. 32.

                      Comment


                      • RH Terrace

                        Ah ha!

                        Compare the 1st floor windows of the two end houses. The one at the W end has 3 pretty much evenly spaced, whereas the E one has 2 and 1, mirroring the mid-terrace next door.

                        I rest my case, M’Lud.

                        Comment


                        • Hi Gary,

                          This has nothing to do with the Cowdrys, but can you make any sense of this plaque in the gable atop 2 Rosehill Road.

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                          Simon

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                          • ‘Insannus Cue Arboretum 1999?’

                            I’ve no idea what it means. How odd.

                            Presumably the house was refurbished in 1999 - and they planted some mad trees in the back garden???

                            Comment


                            • In January (June?), 1917, the Royal Navy carried out a raid on As Salif. Here’s a rather gung-ho contemporary account of the action from 'The Navy Everywhere':


                              ‘The village of Salif is situated on a peninsula, of which the northern end is merely a mud flat, covered by the sea at high tide. To the east of the village is a hunch-back of a hill, which is doubtless of volcanic formation, and in fact has a hollow in it suggesting the relics of a crater. It was in this hollow that the Turkish garrison had taken up their position when, at daybreak on 12 June 1917, our ships approached Salif. The enemy's position was well chosen, for nothing could be seen of it from the sea, and only the high-angle fire of a howitzer could be expected to drop shells into it. Captain Boyle ordered the Espiegle to go northwards round the end of the peninsula, and enter the inlet between peninsula and mainland, possibly with the idea that the Turkish position might be more accessible from the eastern side of it. In any case the presence of a ship on that side would subject the enemy to a cross-fire, which is always disconcerting. The only danger to be avoided was that of the Espiegle's gunlayers, in an excess of enthusiasm, plumping shells right over the hill into the other ships; but fortunately no contretemps of this kind occurred.


                              The Northbrook anchored close inshore at the southern end of the peninsula, while Minto, Topaze, and Odin made a line to the north of her. They all kept as near to the shore as the depth of water would allow, in order that the landing parties might have as short a distance as possible to cover in the boats. As it turned out, the Topaze and Odin unconsciously followed the example of Lord Charles Beresford in the Condor at the bombardment of Alexandria, when he ran his ship in so close that the enemy ashore could not depress their guns sufficiently to hit him. The Turks in their hollow were in exactly the same predicament. They had two Krupp mountain-guns and three one-inch Norden-feldts, with which they blazed away persistently, but their shells, in clearing the sides of the crater, also cleared our ships, and they did not score a single hit, though they occasionally dropped near enough to create an uncomfortable feeling on board.


                              The Northbrook’s men landed at the south end of the peninsula, and took up a position near their ship to the right of the town. The others all landed at the pier, and extended themselves behind a ridge, flanked by a salt-mine at the south end, and by some houses at the north end. They then advanced cautiously to the foot of the hill, making a crescent-shaped line round it, with a party of Marines in the centre. The Odin’s seamen remained behind in the village (where there were no signs of any Turks) and took possession of the condensing plant, the telegraph office, some mines, and one or two harems belonging to the Turkish officials. The last-named were transferred at the first opportunity to the Northbrook, which in due course took the women and children and the civilian males to Aden. Commander A. R. W. Woods of the Topaze was in charge of the landing party, with Commander Salmond of the Odin as his second in command. His plan was to advance up the hill from three directions towards the Turkish position, and thus effectually surround it, for the fourth side was closed by the inlet from which the Espiegle was steadily plumping shells at the Turks. It is probable that the enemy, knowing that our force was a very small one, hoped to cause such havoc in it with their rifle-fire, while our men were coming up the hill, that we should be compelled to abandon the attack. If this was their calculation it failed to take into account the effectiveness of our gunnery.


                              An excellent system of signals had been arranged, and by means of this Commander Woods was able to turn on or off a barrage of fire as if it were a water-tap. The gunlayers were unfortunate in having the sun in their eyes, but, in spite of this, their shooting was so accurate that the men on shore could follow with confidence close behind the barrage. Under its cover they gradually crept towards the foot of the hill whereon the enemy were posted, and then, at a given signal, they made a rush forward and completely surrounded the Turks. The whole business lasted about three hours before the enemy surrendered. In justice to them, it must be said that they put up quite a good fight.


                              There are one or two amusing incidents to be recorded. Sergeant McLoughlin of the Royal Marines came across twelve Turkish soldiers, of whom one was wounded, decided that they were just about his own fighting weight, and went for them without a moment's hesitation. It was perhaps fortunate for him that Petty Officer Beaver was close behind him, for as a general rule the Turk does not allow estimates of this kind to be made with impunity. Between the pair of them they shot one of the twelve, took seven of them prisoners, while the rest retreated precipitately, but only to fall into other hands. Meanwhile Private Bartlett of the Royal Marines was having a little adventure of his own. He chanced upon a hut, and was prompted by curiosity to poke his head inside. There he discovered three Turks and three Arabs, all fully armed. Some people might have been disconcerted and even embarrassed by such a discovery, but Private Bartlett regarded it as merely coming within the day's work. He was no great linguist, but he had his own methods of explaining to the assembled company that they were his prisoners, and he left not a shadow of doubt in their minds that he meant business. So they meekly handed over their rifles, and in due course Private Bartlett, wearing little more than a bland smile (for the sun was beating down hotly) handed them over to his commanding officer.


                              Having captured the whole garrison, together with their guns, ammunition, and stores, and having placed the prisoners aboard the Topaze for transport to Aden, the squadron moved off, leaving only the Espiegle behind to collect what was serviceable of Messrs. Sir John Jackson's plant, and to destroy the rest. Three days were spent in clearing up the place, during which time a company of Indian troops were sent over from Kamaran Island to do garrison duty. There was no idea of holding Salif permanently, for no object was to be gained by doing so. The removal of the condensing plant made the place uninhabitable, since the only water supply is too brackish for ordinary consumption, and it was therefore most improbable that the Turks would attempt to re-occupy the village. Their removal made matters more comfortable for our small garrison at Kamaran, and we must also reckon on the credit side of the account the recovery of a certain amount of useful plant. On the other side we must place the death of Private Read of H.M.S. Odin, who had the misfortune to jump almost on top of a Turk, and to receive a rifle-bullet at point-blank range. It would seem that the Turk fired by accident rather than holding up their hands, realising that they were completely surrounded.’

                              http://www.trenchfighter.homepage.t-...01/458443.html

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                              • Gary:

                                Regarding what you shared with me....well done !!
                                To Join JTR Forums :
                                Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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