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Forty Years Of Scotland Yard : The Book

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  • #76
    Dallas Morning News
    December 8, 1931
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    • #77
      Dallas Morning News
      December 9, 1931
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      • #78
        Dallas Morning News
        December 10,1931
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        • #79
          Dallas Morning News
          December 11,1931
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          • #80
            Dallas Morning News
            December 12, 1931
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            • #81
              Dallas Morning News
              December 13, 1931
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              • #82
                A description of "Forty Years of Scotland Yard",found in the
                Springfield( Mass.) Republican
                October 11, 1931
                by W. Orton Tewson....



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                • #83
                  Another story recently placed on JTRForums mentioning Frederick Porter Wensley in glowing terms :

                  http://www.jtrforums.com/showthread....192#post108192
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                  • #84
                    Light and Shade at Scotland Yard (1947) by H. M. Howgrave-Graham, Secretary, Metropolitan Police, 1927-1946. On page 156 Howgrave-Graham has this to say about Wensley:

                    "A short time after my arrival at Scotland Yard in 1927, I happened to be in the Commissioner's room when he was discussing a murder then under investigation with that notable detective, Chief Constable Wensley. Wensley was at that time the biggest of what the Press were pleased to call the "big four" (since expanded to "big five" and sometimes "big-some other number").

                    The impression I got at that interview was most unexpected. If this were the biggest of the bunch, the others must be pretty small I felt-not in physical stature but in mental state. His speech was slow and seemed to reflect a slow mind. His method of reasoning seemed ponderous and dull. If he "had anything" it was certainly not in the shop window.

                    I was quite wrong. He was in fact an extremely successful detective and (sic) success in crime detection can be precisely weighed by results. He had achieved what he achieved, not by "brilliance" but by astuteness, memory and perseverance. He never forget and let go. In a big case, particularly if accompanied by much publicity, the investigating officers are almost submerged with bits of information, any one of which may conceivably lead them in the direction they want to go. An enormous amount depends on the selection of the most hopeful line to follow. Wensley had the reputation of possessing an almost uncanny power of discrimination in this field. Experience and memory, supplemented by our old friend "flair" were his long suits. He reached his high position-as do all the super-detectives-by the long, hard road. He joined as a constable, did ordinary beat duty in uniform for a time, put his name down for plain-clothes work, was tried out on simple enquiries, became a detective constable, sergeant, second class inspector, first class inspector, chief inspector, superintendent, chief constable. Each and all of these promotions were earned by producing results".

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                    • #85
                      Hi Sean,

                      The Bishopsgate Institute has a Wensley archive including a collection of mugshots that he used to carry around to identify the local likely lads.

                      Arthur Harding had little respect for him. If you look at the link, you'll see some of the mugshots, including one that looks to me like a young Harding.

                      http://spitalfieldslife.com/2011/01/...ue-the-weasel/

                      Gary

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                      • #86
                        Like Tinker to Evers to Chance.....a double play with style.

                        Thanks for the initial post, Sean...which inspired Gary to come up with that great Wensley entry. Its what I like about this Forums joint.
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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                          Hi Sean,

                          The Bishopsgate Institute has a Wensley archive including a collection of mugshots that he used to carry around to identify the local likely lads.

                          Arthur Harding had little respect for him. If you look at the link, you'll see some of the mugshots, including one that looks to me like a young Harding.

                          http://spitalfieldslife.com/2011/01/...ue-the-weasel/

                          Gary
                          Hi Gary,

                          Many thanks for posting the link. Very interesting!

                          Actually, I've been meaning to view the Wensley collection for some time.

                          I think you're correct in your identification of a young Harding.

                          My regards,

                          Sean.

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