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Victorian Post-Mortem Photography

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  • String
    replied
    http://allday.com/post/1358-post-mor...ictorian-trend

    Some of these are a bit disturbing.

    Leave a comment:


  • SirRobertAnderson
    replied
    Originally posted by Wicker Man View Post
    The head clamp also has a strap running under the chin, to hold the head erect?.
    We used quite a few of those at York at the bar....helps a great deal in the wee hours.

    Leave a comment:


  • George Hutchinson
    replied
    Hi all.

    I've not clicked the link yet, so I don't know, but there's no reason from this photo alone to suggest the subject is dead. The hairstyle suggests we're no later than the 1860s and this is an internal shot. There's lots of these long exposures taken professionally inside where the subject is held in place to prevent motion blur. It's particularly noticeable when they took shots of orators who usually have their arm aloft in mid-gesture with some metal stand behind them.

    PHILIP

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  • Wicker Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Stephen Thomas View Post
    Fascinating stuff and quite understandable.

    I've always thought that the photo of PC Amos Simpson is of a corpse.
    The head clamp also has a strap running under the chin, to hold the head erect?.

    I'd say the subject is dead....

    Regards, Jon S.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
    ST:
    Coincidentally, I've always thought Simpson's photo was and is bizarre.
    First time I saw it, I thought it was a scarecrow.
    It could be just a bad photograph of a stiff looking Victorian gentleman who was uncomfortable being photographed. That would be my assumption.

    Chris

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    ST:
    Coincidentally, I've always thought Simpson's photo was and is bizarre.
    First time I saw it, I thought it was a scarecrow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stephen Thomas
    replied
    Fascinating stuff and quite understandable.

    I've always thought that the photo of PC Amos Simpson is of a corpse.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    It was the only way the photographer could get Howard to sit still.

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  • admin tim
    replied
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...s-coffins.html

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  • George Hutchinson
    replied
    I don't see that myself, Chris. I see an urgency from him in trying to look composed. Still - all comments are subjective.

    PHILIP

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  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by George Hutchinson View Post
    What I found most moving was the faces of the parents. Trying to look normal whilst their eyes betray their utter loss. Very sad.

    PHILIP
    Hi Philip

    I can certainly get the sense of grief in the face of the mother but less so with the man. His expression is more one of him bizarrely getting a charge from the occasion... else get that idea? The person at the Flickr site who posted these grim photographs had these salient remarks to say at the URL I posted about "Victorian Mortality":

    "Some of these dead photos featured the person lying down, as if asleep. In others, the person was propped up, and even had his eyes painted in after the photo was taken. In these cases, the only way you can be sure which person is definitely dead is by noting that the face is very clear – the long exposures needed meant that living people tended to blur, slightly."

    You can see that well demonstrated in the photograph in the URL that Roger posted.

    Best regards

    Chris

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  • George Hutchinson
    replied
    What I found most moving was the faces of the parents. Trying to look normal whilst their eyes betray their utter loss. Very sad.

    PHILIP

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by Rbaynton View Post
    Well, I suppose they wouldn't move, given the long exposure time of the day ...
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/brizzle...ed/6384870541/
    What a bizarre photograph! A few years ago I published a picture book of Baltimore. In choosing illustrations for the book, I looked through an archive of photographs taken in funeral homes. Most of the dead though were in coffins, not sitting with their still living relatives. Some of the photographs of people ensconced in their caskets were children. I did not use any of them in the book, although I did use a period photograph of some medical students with a cadaver. I note that the same person on Flickr does have a photograph of a child's corpse covered with flowers, along with some useful comments on "Victorian Mortality." Sobering stuff, to be sure.

    Best regards

    Chris

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  • Rbaynton
    replied
    Victorian Post-mortem photography

    Well, I suppose they wouldn't move, given the long exposure time of the day ...
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/brizzle...ed/6384870541/

    Leave a comment:


  • admin tim
    replied
    The original link seems to have died, but here are some others.

    http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/20...hotography.php

    http://techyum.com/2007/08/vintage_a..._post_mor.html

    http://www.deathonline.net/rememberi.../victorian.cfm

    http://rob-forgottenfaces.blogspot.c...otography.html

    http://www.digital-karma.org/art/vic...em-photography

    http://www.photokaboom.com/photograp...ost_mortem.htm

    http://www.paulfrecker.com/collectio...eID=1&myPage=1

    http://www.photographymuseum.com/selex06.html

    Leave a comment:

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