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Victorian Calling Card Etiquette

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  • Victorian Calling Card Etiquette

    Let Me Leave You My Calling Card

    Want to take a peek into a fascinating social custom from the Victorian era? Calling cards (also called visiting cards or visiting tickets) were all the rage in the 19th century and represented an indispensable way to communicate. The cards did much more than just announce a visit, they relayed important social messages. For example, a calling card with a folded corner, or a card in a sealed envelope sent clear messages that accompanied strict etiquette protocols. By the early 1900s, calling cards fell out of fashion. Today’s business cards are a leftover relic from the calling card era.

    Calling cards first became popular in Europe in the 18th century and were favored by royalty and nobility. Their popularity spread across Europe and to the United States and soon calling cards became essential for the fashionable and wealthy. Society homes often had a silver tray in the entrance hall where guests left their cards. A tray full of cards (with the most prominent cards on top) was a way to display social connections. . . .

    More at https://blog.newspapers.com/let-me-l...-calling-card/


    Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
    https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

    Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
    Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

  • #2
    Thanks Chris for this article. I have several calling cards of men who participated in the Zulu Wars including Chard.
    SPERO IN DEO

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Whitechurch View Post
      Thanks Chris for this article. I have several calling cards of men who participated in the Zulu Wars including Chard.
      Wow. That's great. "Zulu" with Stanley Baker and Michael Caine about Rorke's Drift is one of my favorite films!
      Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
      https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

      Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
      Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

      Comment


      • #4
        Rorke’s Drift was locally referred to including the Zulus themselves was known as “Jimmy’s Place”.
        SPERO IN DEO

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