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Biddy the Chiverís Khazi

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  • #16
    There were anti-Irish riots in 1882. I don't know if you have it, but there is a history online :


    http://www.mike-jones.ukfsn.org/phot/chapter_08.html

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
      There were anti-Irish riots in 1882. I don't know if you have it, but there is a history online :


      http://www.mike-jones.ukfsn.org/phot/chapter_08.html
      Thanks, Rob. I wasnít aware of that.

      I see Red Lion Square gets a mention.

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      • #18
        Hereís the riot Rob mentions:

        In July, 1882, a dreadful riot occurred, which was very destructive in its results. The riot was anticipated long ere it took place, the Irish outrages and murders had created a feeling of horror, mingled with indignation, not only in the inhabitants of Tredegar, but also in the whole English, Welsh, and Scotch nations. The continuous insults given by the Irish to English and Welsh on the streets of Tredegar and in other places, had aroused such an antagonistic feeling that the least opportunity afforded would certainly give vent to the hostility. The Irish had prepared to meet any emergency, large heaps of stone had been collected in Red Lion Square, for the sole purpose of making an assault, and which were freely used at the appointed time. An immense number of people were in the town on the memorable pay Saturday evening, when an Irishman assailed an inoffensive person with a deadly weapon. This was the signal for the fight, stones fell among the people that passed on the road to and from the town, like showers of hail. A large number of English and Welsh had by this time collected together in Red Lion Square, and a general rush was made upon the Irish quarters, doors and windows were shattered, furniture was smashed and collected together to be burnt, the Irish inmates were treated with violence, who made their exit from the scene of tumult, and were seen crossing the hill side towards Rhymney in large numbers. After demolishing the furniture and dwellings of the Irish in Red Lion Square, the infuriated mob proceeded to other parts of the town where Irish resided, entered the houses, destroying furniture and everything within reach, and also abusing the inmates if the least sign of resistance was shewn. The town was wholly in the hands of the mob, police interference was of no avail. Business was suspended at an early hour, and the tumult lasted during the following Sunday. The proceedings of the mob on Sunday were carried on in a most methodical manner. The mob was divided into several gangs, each gang having a leader, and under an orderly arrangement visited every Irish residence in the town. These gangs were seen proceeding in a certain direction, and within an incredible space of time every particle of furniture belonging to the victim had been dragged out to the centre of the flooring or into the road and burnt, leaving the house a complete wreck. Very few Irish remained in the locality, and those who remained, and who were protected and sheltered by kind friends and sympathisers, dared not appear in the streets. The riots wore a more serious aspect during Sunday evening, when it was stated that an Irishman had fired a gun, thereby injuring two or three Englishmen and Welshmen. Through this rash act the Irishman's life was nearly despaired of, and, but for the timely intervention and protection of the police, he would have been torn to pieces. The tumultuous rioters then proceeded towards the town fully bent upon revenging and destroying several public houses, using the most hardened and ferocious threats. But, fortunately, a large number of police had arrived, the riot act was read, and the streets were cleared in a very short time. Troops had been sent for, and a strong company of the 94th regiment arrived late on Sunday night. Their services were not required, as the efficiency of the constabulary had restored order and tranquillity before their arrival in the town.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
          There were anti-Irish riots in 1882.
          There were anti-Jewish riots in Tredegar in 1911:

          https://www.walesonline.co.uk/stark-...riots-15864979

          I note that one of the Jewish shopkeepers was "A Barnett" - no relation. I presume, Gary
          Kind regards, Sam Flynn

          "Suche Nullen"
          (F. Nietzsche)

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
            There were anti-Jewish riots in Tredegar in 1911:

            https://www.walesonline.co.uk/stark-...riots-15864979

            I note that one of the Jewish shopkeepers was "A Barnett" - no relation. I presume, Gary
            Thanks, Gareth.

            No wonder Biddy was such a disturbed individual, being brought up in that environment!

            My Barnetts weren’t Jewish as far as I know, they were CofE horse slaughterers going back to the 18th century.

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            • #21
              I didn't know horses could join the C of E.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                I didn't know horses could join the C of E.
                Not sure. But I believe donkeys can:

                https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Vs6SIvnurl0

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                • #23
                  Ah, I sang it at school.


                  I'm not sure that Julia Enright was ever married, but she's with George E Butcher in 1901 at 53 Meath Rd, West Ham.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                    I didn't know horses could join the C of E.
                    I can hear the advertising blurb now:

                    "Horses... putting the 'canter' into Canterbury for generations"
                    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                    "Suche Nullen"
                    (F. Nietzsche)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                      Ah, I sang it at school.


                      I'm not sure that Julia Enright was ever married, but she's with George E Butcher in 1901 at 53 Meath Rd, West Ham.
                      And she’s calling herself Butcher in 1911, living in Moore’s Buildings with two old Biddies (mum and sister).

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                        I can hear the advertising blurb now:

                        "Horses... putting the 'canter' into Canterbury for generations"
                        I canter bide blasphemous puns.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Let your Yea be Yea and your Nay be Neigh.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                            Let your Yea be Yea and your Nay be Neigh.
                            St. Matthew, or Jimmy Cliff?

                            https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MWd0hT4bkOE

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                            • #29
                              The Cliff version - St Matthew's more a genealogy kind of guy.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                                The Cliff version - St Matthew's more a genealogy kind of guy.
                                Speaking of genealogy, can you guess what Bridget Enright’s mum’s maiden name was?

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