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Biddy the Chiver’s Khazi

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Catherine’s birth certificate came through this morning.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    GRO ISSUE

    I ordered an Enright birth certificate recently, in pdf format, and it was supposedly despatched yesterday, but there’s no ‘View PDF’ button showing. Has anyone had that problem before? It’s a first for me.

    I’ve been trying to contact the GRO, but they seem to be overwhelmed with enquiries and are not answering their phones.
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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Phillip Walton View Post
    Thats not dissimilar to the house my mother was born in and not that far away. My mother was born in Brownlow Road, Dalston and likewise it still exists and is valued a similar amount. A few businesses and properties in the area were owned by my grandfathers family.
    It’s quite an attractive little house. The O’Rourkes occupied 2 rooms and were the only occupants when the 1921 Census was taken.

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  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    Thats not dissimilar to the house my mother was born in and not that far away. My mother was born in Brownlow Road, Dalston and likewise it still exists and is valued a similar amount. A few businesses and properties in the area were owned by my grandfathers family.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    The 1921 census reveals that Biddy and Tommy O’Rourke were living at 51, Cropley Street, Hoxton. And, amazingly, it still exists - worth over £1 Million today.
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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Comparing the Lloyds’ account of Kate Webb’s 1895 OB trial to the OB Online transcript shows that the OB transcript is incomplete in that it excludes Webb’s cross-examination questions/comments and only records the answers to them.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Crooked Billet Yard last week:

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    This incident, as reported in the Evening Standard of 9th June, 1892, may be the origin of the ‘Chiver’ moniker. Aged 18, Bridget Enright slashed the face of a woman named Bridget Pigott whom she claimed had ‘accused me for nothing’. She received one month’s hard at the Thames police court.
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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Click image for larger version  Name:	386DDDA9-55A9-40CA-8E40-82109DADC712.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	205.9 KB ID:	583947

    It seems that Biddy’s story has attracted the attention of academia.

    The more the merrier!

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post

    Wikipedia actually has a short page on "Shiv" and a longer page on Wiktionary. That is how it is pronounced in American gangster films.

    The word may come from a Romani word for knife, chivvomengro which supplies various verbs. It can also mean the woody remains from processing flax or hemp, or to stab someone with something that is not necessarily a knife.

    We learn Z = zee in grade school and to be clear, Z as in zebra. Internationally zed is correct. Zee like zebra leads to corrections and ridicule.
    Thanks, Anna. Of course I wasn’t denigrating US pronunciations, just the fact that they are adopted by my grandkids.

    It’s odd that Biddy arrives on the scene with her nickname already established and we can’t find any previous incidents to justify it. Perhaps she earned it without falling foul of the authorities.

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

    Thats how Ive always said it, but people often say shiv. My grandkids tell me Ive got it wrong, but their pronunciations are horribly American. They even say Zee instead of Zed!

    Does it have the same origin as chivvy - to hurry someone along?
    Wikipedia actually has a short page on "Shiv" and a longer page on Wiktionary. That is how it is pronounced in American gangster films.

    The word may come from a Romani word for knife, chivvomengro which supplies various verbs. It can also mean the woody remains from processing flax or hemp, or to stab someone with something that is not necessarily a knife.

    We learn Z = zee in grade school and to be clear, Z as in zebra. Internationally zed is correct. Zee like zebra leads to corrections and ridicule.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    https://outsidethezonegallery.com/pa...-project-space

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    The entrance to Crooked Billet Yard in 2020.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	3A4E8FD6-CE72-4133-A1CA-5F6031408B13.jpeg
Views:	1
Size:	91.6 KB
ID:	561369

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
    Pronounced as spelt.
    A chiv = knife
    That’s how I’ve always said it, but people often say ‘shiv’. My grandkids tell me I’ve got it wrong, but their pronunciations are horribly American. They even say Zee instead of Zed!

    Does it have the same origin as ‘chivvy’ - to hurry someone along?

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward Stow
    replied
    Pronounced as spelt.
    A chiv = knife

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