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  • Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
    A definate possibility. If Fogerty was with Tabram on that night it's reasonable to suggest that he got Poll to lie about the soldiers (especially considering TW's research which suggests that Poll was with MT that night.)

    I was thinking about what effect on a violent, unbalanced Fogerty, the knowledge that he was going blind would have? Times were tough enough. Could it have tipped him over the edge?
    Of course, there's no hard evidence that Poll and Foggy even knew each other in August, 1888. But NE Passage was tiny, so if they were both living there, Poll would have known Foggy by sight (probably not vice versa, though ).

    Good point about the effect of his going blind on his temper.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
      Of course, there's no hard evidence that Poll and Foggy even knew each other in August, 1888. But NE Passage was tiny, so if they were both living there, Poll would have known Foggy by sight (probably not vice versa, though ).

      Good point about the effect of his going blind on his temper.
      I couldn't remember if we knew the cause of Foggy's blindness? Looking at his photograph I was trying to be a bit Sherlock Holmes (as opposed to Herlock Sholmes!) As he appears unmarked (by scars etc) around the eyes would that suggest a degenerative illness as opposed to an accident where something hit him in the face/eyes? It's not certain of course.
      Regards

      Michael🔎


      " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
        I couldn't remember if we knew the cause of Foggy's blindness? Looking at his photograph I was trying to be a bit Sherlock Holmes (as opposed to Herlock Sholmes!) As he appears unmarked (by scars etc) around the eyes would that suggest a degenerative illness as opposed to an accident where something hit him in the face/eyes? It's not certain of course.
        We don't know the cause. He stated that he had been in the army at one stage, so he wasn't born blind. His left cheek looks somewhat deformed to me - I'm not sure if that's significant.

        Comment


        • >>Stride's church was actually in the neighbouring Prince's/Swedenborg Square. <<

          Doh! It's the Danish church in Wellcose! Bloody Scandi's all look the same to me;-)

          >>Its 'NE Passage' was Shovel Alley, where my mother's family lived. <<

          As patrolled by Leeson in his memoirs.
          Thanks for your time,
          dusty miller

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Dusty Miller View Post
            >>Stride's church was actually in the neighbouring Prince's/Swedenborg Square. <<

            Doh! It's the Danish church in Wellcose! Bloody Scandi's all look the same to me;-)

            >>Its 'NE Passage' was Shovel Alley, where my mother's family lived. <<

            As patrolled by Leeson in his memoirs.
            That's right, Dusty. Leeson was apparently told that it was called Shovel Alley because fierce colliers lived there who fought with shovels. The truth is that the alley (properly Mayfields Buildings) was accessed from Cable Street through an archway in the Shovel pub, and that's where the nickname came from.

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            • For some time I've been looking for evidence of Harrison, Barber importing provincial cat's meat by rail. The following extract from a report in the Northampton Mercury of 31st March, 1893 suggests they did. No railway terminus is mentioned, but the LNWR ran goods services between Northampton and London Broad Street and it is known that provincial cat's meat arrived at Broad Street. It is also known that Pickfords collected cats's meat from the LNWR for onward delivery.

              Harrison, Barber's London area yards were located in Islington (near the Regents Canal), Whitechapel, Southwark (close to the river) and Wandsworth (Garrett Lane by the river Wandle).

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              • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                For some time I've been looking for evidence of Harrison, Barber importing provincial cat's meat by rail. The following extract from a report in the Northampton Mercury of 31st March, 1893 suggests they did. No railway terminus is mentioned, but the LNWR ran goods services between Northampton and London Broad Street and it is known that provincial cat's meat arrived at Broad Street. It is also known that Pickfords collected cats's meat from the LNWR for onward delivery.

                Harrison, Barber's London area yards were located in Islington (near the Regents Canal), Whitechapel, Southwark (close to the river) and Wandsworth (Garrett Lane by the river Wandle).

                [ATTACH]18262[/ATTACH]

                Is it just me Gary but are those sites possibly linked to some of the Torso parts?

                Steve

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                • Originally posted by Steve Blomer View Post
                  Is it just me Gary but are those sites possibly linked to some of the Torso parts?

                  Steve
                  Blimey! I hadn't spotted that. 😉

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                    [ATTACH]18262[/ATTACH]
                    A magistrate named Cleaver presiding over a case involving cats' meat
                    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                    "Suche Nullen"
                    (F. Nietzsche)

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                    • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                      A magistrate named Cleaver presiding over a case involving cats' meat
                      You couldn't make it up...

                      Comment


                      • >>It is also known that Pickfords collected cats's meat from the LNWR for onward delivery.<<

                        Did I miss this info?
                        Thanks for your time,
                        dusty miller

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Dusty Miller View Post
                          >>It is also known that Pickfords collected cats's meat from the LNWR for onward delivery.<<

                          Did I miss this info?
                          You may have, Dusty. On the Broad Street thread, I think, a report of Pickfords' vans loaded with cat's meat in Liverpool Street (where the entrance to Broad Street station was). Pickfords were the LNWR carriers.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                            You may have, Dusty. On the Broad Street thread, I think, a report of Pickfords' vans loaded with cat's meat in Liverpool Street (where the entrance to Broad Street station was). Pickfords were the LNWR carriers.
                            Post 40 here:

                            http://www.jtrforums.com/showthread....rds#post332515

                            Comment


                            • Thanks Gary.
                              Thanks for your time,
                              dusty miller

                              Comment


                              • Potler?

                                I think I may have identified 'Potler', John Harrison's superstar foreman knacker who appears in the All The Year Round article (posts 706 -712 of this thread).

                                I had no success searching for the name Potler, but using the term 'foreman horse-slaughterer' produced an interesting press report concerning a case of a glandered horse being sold at the Islington market in 1867. It's a long report, but this extract contains the relevant info:

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                                The All The Year Round piece was written in 1869, two years after the glanders case. Mention of an inspector named Hunt who was formerly a brushmaker, and the fact that the diseased horse was sold at the Islington horse market points to the slaughteryard in question being John Harrison's premises in Maiden Lane/York Road (known as Atcheler's Yard after its former owner).

                                The 1861 census shows Caleb Hunt, then still a brushmaker, living at Atcheler's Yard. It also shows a 26-year-old James Cutler, occupation Horse Slaughterer and POB Clerkenwell.

                                Cutler's 1875 marriage certificate provides his father's name and occupation: James Cutler, farrier. And his christening record gives the address of Cow Cross, Clerkenwell, which was where Jack Atcheler had his premises before moving to Maiden Lane.

                                You've got to smile at Cutler's mishearing of tubercles as 'two buckles'.

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