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Harrison Barber—Horse Slaughterers

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  • Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Bloody hell, coal heaving at that age.
    You'd think she would have realised by then that it didn't agree with her. (Your joke originally).

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    • sistersofthepoleaxe

      Anyone have a copy of the April, 1931 Farmer and Stockbreeder knocking about?

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      • sistersofthepoleaxe

        1913:

        [ATTACH]18796[/ATTACH]

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        • Hippophagy

          https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/ext/.../101522573.pdf

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          • The Vaugirard Abbattoir

            Link to an interesting thread by Catherine de Villenueve:

            http://www.jtrforums.com/showthread.php?t=30584

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            • This made me grin. A horse slaughterer, accused of cruelly using a lame horse to pull a knacker’s cart, claims that the horse was sound when he began his journey, but the (dead) horse on the cart kicked it en route. At least that’s how I read it.

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              • This is a great website for various forms of ephemera:

                http://www.sheaff-ephemera.com/list/...previous-photo

                The image below is of the business card of a Bilston knacker named Robert Hodgkinson. My ancestor George Robert Barnett worked for the Hodgkinson family in the 1850s, as I believe did another ex-Whitechapel knacker named Nicholas Shipp(e)y. The Barnett and Shippy families had worked for William Monk in Whitechapel before moving to the Midlands. Monk subsequently bequeathed his business to his assistant William Barber and the rest, as they say, is history.

                I suspect that Shippy intentionally followed the Barnetts from Whitechapel to Bilston after the death of his father. Thomas Henry Barnett was a witness to Shippy’s 1858 marriage. By the early 1860s the Barnetts had returned to London - to Islington where the Tomkins family were working at the Belle Isle Yard that would shortly be taken over by John Harrison. Shippy stayed in the Midlands, relocating to Wolverhampton to work for a knacker named Leech/Leach.

                In the early 1870s, the Tomkins family left Islington and found their way to Newton Heath near Manchester. The head of the family, William Tomkins, had been convicted of stealing horse fat from his employer, John Harrison, and had served some time in Coldbath Fields prison.

                At around this time, the Wolverhampton Leech/Leach family opened a yard in Newton Heath, and by 1881, Nicholas Shippy was lodging with Henry Tomkins in the area.

                In 1886, the firm of Harrison, Barber was created by John Harrison Jnr. Its headquarters were in Belle Isle, Islington and among six other yards was one in Winthrop Street, Whitechapel.

                Then in late 1887/ early 1888, after John Harrison had left the firm he had created just a year or two previously, the Tomkins family moved to Whitechapel to work in the same street (Winthrop Street) from where the Barnett and Shippy families had moved ca 1850 (then called Little North Street). Running the yard inn 1888 was Alfred Barber, another founder member of the firm of Harrison, Barber, and the son of William Barber.

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                • To Join JTR Forums :
                  Contact [email protected]

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                  • Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post

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                    • Bump up.


                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEkwNic4Ux0

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                      • Don’t Panic!

                        Or perhaps we should?

                        I haven’t been to Belle Isle for ages, but saw this online yesterday. This old building, that looks as if it’s about to fall down, was once the ‘counting house’ (office) of HB’s headquarters in Islington. Why they had to demolish the fairly modern building next door is beyond me.

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                        • Perhaps the older building is listed?

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                          • Originally posted by Phillip Walton View Post
                            Perhaps the older building is listed?
                            It may be, Phillip.

                            There’s mention of it on the planning docs re the new building, There were concerns that the proposed basement of the new build might destabilised the old building, so the plans were adjusted.

                            Whether they know it or not, that building is one of the most historically significant in the area.

                            https://planning.islington.gov.uk/No...s/00448706.pdf

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                            • Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                              I think the first comment on this one just about sums it up Robert
                              Regards

                              Michael🔎


                              " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

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                              • From the Standard 9/5/1901:

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                                By law, knackers yards were required to display a sign saying that the premises was a knackers yard.

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