Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Germans In Whitechapel

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    And there are other dangers associated with German musicality.

    From Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome:

    Speaking of comic songs and parties, reminds me of a rather curious incident at which I once assisted; which, as it throws much light upon the inner mental working of human nature in general, ought, I think, to be recorded in these pages.

    We were a fashionable and highly cultured party. We had on our best clothes, and we talked pretty, and were very happy — all except two young fellows, students, just returned from Germany, commonplace young men, who seemed restless and uncomfortable, as if they found the proceedings slow. The truth was, we were too clever for them. Our brilliant but polished conversation, and our high-class tastes, were beyond them. They were out of place, among us. They never ought to have been there at all. Everybody agreed upon that, later on.

    We played Morceaux from the old German masters. We discussed philosophy and ethics. We flirted with graceful dignity. We were even humorous — in a high-class way.

    Somebody recited a French poem after supper, and we said it was beautiful; and then a lady sang a sentimental ballad in Spanish, and it made one or two of us weep — it was so pathetic.

    And then those two young men got up, and asked us if we had ever heard Herr Slossenn Boschen (who had just arrived, and was then down in the supper-room) sing his great German comic song.

    None of us had heard it, that we could remember.

    The young men said it was the funniest song that had ever been written, and that, if we liked, they would get Herr Slossenn Boschen, whom they knew very well, to sing it. They said it was so funny that, when Herr Slossenn Boschen had sung it once before the German Emperor, he (the German Emperor) had had to be carried off to bed.

    They said nobody could sing it like Herr Slossenn Boschen; he was so intensely serious all through it that you might fancy he was reciting a tragedy, and that, of course, made it all the funnier. They said he never once suggested by his tone or manner that he was singing anything funny — that would spoil it. It was his air of seriousness, almost of pathos, that made it so irresistibly amusing.

    We said we yearned to hear it, that we wanted a good laugh; and they went downstairs, and fetched Herr Slossenn Boschen.

    He appeared to be quite pleased to sing it, for he came up at once, and sat down to the piano without another word.

    "Oh, it will amuse you. You will laugh," whispered the two young men, as they passed through the room, and took up an unobtrusive position behind the Professor's back.

    Herr Slossenn Boschen accompanied himself. The prelude did not suggest a comic song exactly. It was a weird, soulful air. It quite made one's flesh creep; but we murmured to one another that it was the German method, and prepared to enjoy it.

    I don't understand German myself. I learned it at school, but forgot every word of it two years after I had left, and have felt much better ever since. Still, I did not want the people there to guess my ignorance; so I hit upon what I thought to be rather a good idea. I kept my eye on the two young students, and followed them. When they tittered, I tittered; when they roared, I roared; and I also threw in a little snigger all by myself now and then, as if I had seen a bit of humour that had escaped the others. I considered this particularly artful on my part.

    I noticed, as the song progressed, that a good many other people seemed to have their eye fixed on the two young men, as well as myself. These other people also tittered when the young men tittered, and roared when the young men roared; and, as the two young men tittered and roared and exploded with laughter pretty continuously all through the song, it went exceedingly well.

    And yet that German Professor did not seem happy. At first, when we began to laugh, the expression of his face was one of intense surprise, as if laughter were the very last thing he had expected to be greeted with. We thought this very funny: we said his earnest manner was half the humour. The slightest hint on his part that he knew how funny he was would have completely ruined it all. As we continued to laugh, his surprise gave way to an air of annoyance and indignation, and he scowled fiercely round upon us all (except upon the two young men who, being behind him, he could not see). That sent us into convulsions. We told each other that it would be the death of us, this thing. The words alone, we said, were enough to send us into fits, but added to his mock seriousness — oh, it was too much!

    In the last verse, he surpassed himself. He glowered round upon us with a look of such concentrated ferocity that, but for our being forewarned as to the German method of comic singing, we should have been nervous; and he threw such a wailing note of agony into the weird music that, if we had not known it was a funny song, we might have wept.

    He finished amid a perfect shriek of laughter. We said it was the funniest thing we had ever heard in all our lives. We said how strange it was that, in the face of things like these, there should be a popular notion that the Germans hadn't any sense of humour. And we asked the Professor why he didn't translate the song into English, so that the common people could understand it, and hear what a real comic song was like.

    Then Herr Slossenn Boschen got up, and went on awful. He swore at us in German (which I should judge to be a singularly effective language for that purpose), and he danced, and shook his fists, and called us all the English he knew. He said he had never been so insulted in all his life.

    It appeared that the song was not a comic song at all. It was about a young girl who lived in the Hartz Mountains, and who had given up her life to save her lover's soul; and he died, and met her spirit in the air; and then, in the last verse, he jilted her spirit, and went on with another spirit — I'm not quite sure of the details, but it was something very sad, I know. Herr Boschen said he had sung it once before the German Emperor, and he (the German Emperor) had sobbed like a little child. He (Herr Boschen) said it was generally acknowledged to be one of the most tragic and pathetic songs in the German language.

    It was a trying situation for us — very trying. There seemed to be no answer. We looked around for the two young men who had done this thing, but they had left the house in an unostentatious manner immediately after the end of the song.

    That was the end of that party. I never saw a party break up so quietly, and with so little fuss. We never said good-night even to one another. We came downstairs one at a time, walking softly, and keeping the shady side. We asked the servant for our hats and coats in whispers, and opened the door for ourselves, and slipped out, and got round the corner quickly, avoiding each other as much as possible.

    I have never taken much interest in German songs since then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Kattrup View Post
    Obviously, the cart driver just couldn't Handel german music.
    Looking at who he worked for, he was probably Brahms and Liszt (rhyming slang).

    Leave a comment:


  • Kattrup
    replied
    Obviously, the cart driver just couldn't Handel german music.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Many of the sugar refineries in the East End were staffed by German sugar bakers. The one in Breezers Hill for example was operated entirely by Hanoverians, it would seem.

    http://www.mawer.clara.net/intro.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Those bands really were a nuisance:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpeg
Views:	1
Size:	145.2 KB
ID:	557378

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy Corduroy
    replied
    Composer George Friedrich Handel was the most famous German musician to make his home in London.

    A short video clip of my favorite song of his. (click)

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy Corduroy
    replied
    Hi Thomas,

    I enjoyed the article you posted, which was a tour of London East and West.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	pop2new.GIF
Views:	1
Size:	22.8 KB
ID:	550511

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Ha ha !!! I've seen those articles Roy !! Thanks for that.

    Assoc for the Suppression of Street Noises.

    or...ASS Noises...

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy Corduroy
    replied
    Howie, in the beginning of your article there is reference to mathematician Charles Babbage, who was part of the reaction against German brass bands in London.

    Musicians were amongst German immigrants, including orchestral players. There were also brass brands, the opposition to which focused on their numbers, the noise they made and the hazards which they caused to London traffic. The campaign in the 1860's had as it supporters Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Babbage, MP Michael Bass. as well as sections of the press. This led to the passage of the Street Music (Metropolis) Act of 1864. Still the music continued and another effort developed in the 1890's leading to the founding of the Assoc for the Supression of Street Noises.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	BB2.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	148.7 KB
ID:	550510

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    that's true.
    but i believe the article is quite accurate with its statements, so why show different pictures. it's not the living london style .-)
    although i certainly agree with your opinion and think that not all of the people seen in the photo are germans, but some are i guess...atleast hans and franz .-))

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Thank you for posting the article, Thomas. My point of course that we would not expect all the people aboard a British flag vessel to be British, nor the people aboard an American ship to be Americans. I grant that the article talks about Germans who emigrated to London and then used the German institutions in the city. Fair enough!

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    here's the full article
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    hi chris,

    i have to re-check the article. i think it came with some text, which might clarify what is seen in the picture.

    take care
    thomas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy Corduroy
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	pop1new.GIF
Views:	1
Size:	14.9 KB
ID:	550502
    Roy

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    "Arrivals by a German Steamer"

    But that doesn't necessarily mean that those pictured were German, does it? Possibly the people in the photograph were East European Jews.

    Chris

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X